dbcheck

DBCHECK(8)         Network backup, recovery and verification        DBCHECK(8)



NAME
        dbcheck - Bacula's Catalog Database Check/Clean program

SYNOPSIS
       dbcheck [options] working-directory bacula-database user password
       [dbhost] [dbport]

DESCRIPTION
       This manual page documents briefly the dbcheck command.

       dbcheck will not repair your database if it is broken. Please see your
       vendor's instructions for fixing broken database.

       dbcheck is a simple program that will search for logical
       inconsistencies in the Bacula tables in your database, and optionally
       fix them.  It is a database maintenance routine, in the sense that it
       can detect and remove unused rows, but it is not a database repair
       routine. To repair a database, see the tools furnished by the database
       vendor.  Normally dbcheck should never need to be run, but if Bacula
       has crashed or you have a lot of Clients, Pools, or Jobs that you have
       removed, it could be useful.

OPTIONS
       A summary of options is included below.

       -?     Show version and usage of program.

       -b     If specified, dbcheck will run in batch mode, and it will
              proceed to examine and fix (if -f is set) all programmed
              inconsistency checks. By default, dbcheck will enter interactive
              mode (see below).

       -C catalog
              catalog name in the director conf file.

       -c config
              If the -c option is given with the Director's conf file, there
              is no need to enter any of the command line arguments, in
              particular the working directory as dbcheck will read them from
              the file.

       -B     print catalog configuration and exit.

       -d nn  set debug level to nn.

       -dt    print timestamp in debug output.

       -f     If specified, dbcheck will repair (fix) the inconsistencies it
              finds.  Otherwise, it will report only.

       -v     Set verbose mode.

INTERACTIVE MODE
       In interactive mode dbcheck will prompt with the following:

       Hello, this is the database check/correct program.  Please select the
       function you want to perform.
            1) Toggle modify database flag
            2) Toggle verbose flag
            3) Repair bad Filename records
            4) Repair bad Path records
            5) Eliminate duplicate Filename records
            6) Eliminate duplicate Path records
            7) Eliminate orphaned Jobmedia records
            8) Eliminate orphaned File records
            9) Eliminate orphaned Path records
           10) Eliminate orphaned Filename records
           11) Eliminate orphaned FileSet records
           12) Eliminate orphaned Client records
           13) Eliminate orphaned Job records
           14) Eliminate all Admin records
           15) Eliminate all Restore records
           16) All (3-15)
           17) Quit Select function number:

       By entering 1 or 2, you can toggle the modify database flag (-f option)
       and the verbose flag (-v).  It can be helpful and reassuring to turn
       off the modify database flag, then select one or more of the
       consistency checks (items 3 through 9) to see what will be done, then
       toggle the modify flag on and re-run the check.

       The inconsistencies examined are the following:

        Duplicate filename records.  This can happen if you accidentally run
       two
          copies of Bacula at the same time, and they are both adding
       filenames
          simultaneously.  It is a rare occurrence, but will create an
          inconsistent database.  If this is the case, you will receive error
          messages during Jobs warning of duplicate database records.  If you
       are
          not getting these error messages, there is no reason to run this
       check.

        Repair bad Filename records.  This checks and corrects filenames that
       have
          a trailing slash.  They should not.

        Repair bad Path records.  This checks and corrects path names that do
       not
          have a trailing slash.  They should.

        Duplicate path records.  This can happen if you accidentally run two
       copies
          of Bacula at the same time, and they are both adding filenames
          simultaneously.  It is a rare occurrence, but will create an
          inconsistent database.  See the item above for why this occurs and
       how
          you know it is happening.

        Orphaned JobMedia records.  This happens when a Job record is deleted
          (perhaps by a user issued SQL statement), but the corresponding
       JobMedia
          record (one for each Volume used in the Job) was not deleted.
       Normally,
          this should not happen, and even if it does, these records generally
       do
          not take much space in your database.  However, by running this
       check,
          you can eliminate any such orphans.

        Orphaned File records.  This happens when a Job record is deleted
       (perhaps
          by a user issued SQL statement), but the corresponding File record
       (one
          for each Volume used in the Job) was not deleted.  Note, searching
       for
          these records can be very time consuming (i.e.  it may take hours)
       for a
          large database.  Normally this should not happen as Bacula takes
       care to
          prevent it.  Just the same, this check can remove any orphaned File
          records.  It is recommended that you run this once a year since
       orphaned
          File records can take a large amount of space in your database.  You
          might want to ensure that you have indexes on JobId, FilenameId, and
          PathId for the File table in your catalog before running this
       command.

        Orphaned Path records.  This condition happens any time a directory is
          deleted from your system and all associated Job records have been
          purged.  During standard purging (or pruning) of Job records, Bacula
          does not check for orphaned Path records.  As a consequence, over a
          period of time, old unused Path records will tend to accumulate and
       use
          space in your database.  This check will eliminate them.  It is
          recommended that you run this check at least once a year.

        Orphaned Filename records.  This condition happens any time a file is
          deleted from your system and all associated Job records have been
          purged.  This can happen quite frequently as there are quite a large
          number of files that are created and then deleted.  In addition, if
       you
          do a system update or delete an entire directory, there can be a
       very
          large number of Filename records that remain in the catalog but are
       no
          longer used.

          During standard purging (or pruning) of Job records, Bacula does not
          check for orphaned Filename records.  As a consequence, over a
       period of
          time, old unused Filename records will accumulate and use space in
       your
          database.  This check will eliminate them.  It is strongly
       recommended
          that you run this check at least once a year, and for large database
          (more than 200 Megabytes), it is probably better to run this once
       every
          6 months.

        Orphaned Client records.  These records can remain in the database
       long
          after you have removed a client.

        Orphaned Job records.  If no client is defined for a job or you do not
       run
          a job for a long time, you can accumulate old job records.  This
       option
          allow you to remove jobs that are not attached to any client (and
       thus
          useless).

        All Admin records. This command will remove all Admin records,
          regardless of their age.

        All Restore records. This command will remove all Restore records,
          regardless of their age.

       By the way, I personally run dbcheck only where I have messed up my
       database due to a bug in developing Bacula code, so normally you should
       never need to run dbcheck inspite of the recommendations given above,
       which are given so that users don't waste their time running dbcheck
       too often.


SEE ALSO
       bls(1), bextract(1).

AUTHOR
       This manual page was written by Jose Luis Tallon
       <jltallon@adv-solutions.net>.



Kern Sibbald                   26 September 2009                    DBCHECK(8)