set

set(1)                               fish                               set(1)



NAME
       set - display and change shell variables.

   Synopsis
       set [SCOPE_OPTIONS]
       set [OPTIONS] VARIABLE_NAME VALUES...
       set [OPTIONS] VARIABLE_NAME[INDICES]... VALUES...
       set ( -q | --query ) [SCOPE_OPTIONS] VARIABLE_NAMES...
       set ( -e | --erase ) [SCOPE_OPTIONS] VARIABLE_NAME
       set ( -e | --erase ) [SCOPE_OPTIONS] VARIABLE_NAME[INDICES]...
       set ( -S | --show ) [SCOPE_OPTIONS] [VARIABLE_NAME]...

   Description
       set manipulates shell variables.

       If set is called with no arguments, the names and values of all shell
       variables are printed in sorted order. If some of the scope or export
       flags have been given, only the variables matching the specified scope
       are printed.

       With both variable names and values provided, set assigns the variable
       VARIABLE_NAME the values VALUES....

       The following options control variable scope:

       · -a or --append causes the values to be appended to the current set of
         values for the variable. This can be used with --prepend to both
         append and prepend at the same time. This cannot be used when
         assigning to a variable slice.

       · -p or --prepend causes the values to be prepended to the current set
         of values for the variable. This can be used with --append to both
         append and prepend at the same time. This cannot be used when
         assigning to a variable slice.

       · -l or --local forces the specified shell variable to be given a scope
         that is local to the current block, even if a variable with the given
         name exists and is non-local

       · -g or --global causes the specified shell variable to be given a
         global scope. Non-global variables disappear when the block they
         belong to ends

       · -U or --universal causes the specified shell variable to be given a
         universal scope. If this option is supplied, the variable will be
         shared between all the current user's fish instances on the current
         computer, and will be preserved across restarts of the shell.

       · -x or --export causes the specified shell variable to be exported to
         child processes (making it an 'environment variable')

       · -u or --unexport causes the specified shell variable to NOT be
         exported to child processes

       The following options are available:

       · -e or --erase causes the specified shell variable to be erased

       · -q or --query test if the specified variable names are defined. Does
         not output anything, but the builtins exit status is the number of
         variables specified that were not defined.

       · -n or --names List only the names of all defined variables, not their
         value. The names are guaranteed to be sorted.

       · -S or --show Shows information about the given variables. If no
         variable names are given then all variables are shown in sorted
         order. No other flags can be used with this option. The information
         shown includes whether or not it is set in each of the local, global,
         and universal scopes. If it is set in one of those scopes whether or
         not it is exported is reported. The individual elements are also
         shown along with the length of each element.

       · -L or --long do not abbreviate long values when printing set
         variables

       If a variable is set to more than one value, the variable will be an
       array with the specified elements. If a variable is set to zero
       elements, it will become an array with zero elements.

       If the variable name is one or more array elements, such as PATH[1 3
       7], only those array elements specified will be changed. If you specify
       a negative index when expanding or assigning to an array variable, the
       index will be calculated from the end of the array. For example, the
       index -1 means the last index of an array.

       The scoping rules when creating or updating a variable are:

       1.  Variables may be explicitly set to universal, global or local.
           Variables with the same name in different scopes will not be
           changed.

       2.  If a variable is not explicitly set to be either universal, global
           or local, but has been previously defined, the previous variable
           scope is used.

       3.  If a variable is not explicitly set to be either universal, global
           or local and has never before been defined, the variable will be
           local to the currently executing function. Note that this is
           different from using the -l or --local flag. If one of those flags
           is used, the variable will be local to the most inner currently
           executing block, while without these the variable will be local to
           the function. If no function is executing, the variable will be
           global.

       The exporting rules when creating or updating a variable are identical
       to the scoping rules for variables:

       1.  Variables may be explicitly set to either exported or not exported.
           When an exported variable goes out of scope, it is unexported.

       2.  If a variable is not explicitly set to be exported or not exported,
           but has been previously defined, the previous exporting rule for
           the variable is kept.

       3.  If a variable is not explicitly set to be either exported or
           unexported and has never before been defined, the variable will not
           be exported.

       In query mode, the scope to be examined can be specified.

       In erase mode, if variable indices are specified, only the specified
       slices of the array variable will be erased.

       set requires all options to come before any other arguments. For
       example, set flags -l will have the effect of setting the value of the
       variable flags to '-l', not making the variable local.

       In assignment mode, set does not modify the exit status. This allows
       simultaneous capture of the output and exit status of a subcommand,
       e.g. if set output (command). In query mode, the exit status is the
       number of variables that were not found. In erase mode, set exits with
       a zero exit status in case of success, with a non-zero exit status if
       the commandline was invalid, if the variable was write-protected or if
       the variable did not exist.

   Examples
         Prints all global, exported variables.
       set -xg

         Sets the value of the variable $foo to be 'hi'.
       set foo hi

         Appends the value 'there' to the variable $foo.
       set -a foo there

         Does the same thing as the previous two commands the way it would be done pre-fish 3.0.
       set foo hi
       set foo $foo there

         Removes the variable $smurf
       set -e smurf

         Changes the fourth element of the $PATH array to ~/bin
       set PATH[4] ~/bin

         Outputs the path to Python if `type -p` returns true.
       if set python_path (type -p python)
           echo 'Python is at $python_path'
       end

   Notes
       Fish versions prior to 3.0 supported the syntax set PATH[1] PATH[4]
       /bin /sbin, which worked like set PATH[1 4] /bin /sbin. This syntax was
       not widely used, and was ambiguous and inconsistent.



Version 3.0.2                   Tue Mar 26 2019                         set(1)