test

TEST(1)                     General Commands Manual                    TEST(1)



NAME
       test - set status according to condition

SYNOPSIS
       test expr

DESCRIPTION
       Test evaluates the expression expr.  If the value is true the exit
       status is null; otherwise the exit status is non-null.  If there are no
       arguments the exit status is non-null.

       The following primitives are used to construct expr.

       -r file    True if the file exists (is accessible) and is readable.

       -w file    True if the file exists and is writable.

       -x file    True if the file exists and has execute permission.

       -e file    True if the file exists.

       -f file    True if the file exists and is a plain file.

       -d file    True if the file exists and is a directory.

       -s file    True if the file exists and has a size greater than zero.

       -t fildes  True if the open file whose file descriptor number is fildes
                  (1 by default) is the same file as /dev/cons.

       -A file    True if the file exists and is append-only.

       -L file    True if the file exists and is exclusive-use.

       -Tfile     True if the file exists and is temporary.

       s1 = s2    True if the strings s1 and s2 are identical.

       s1 != s2   True if the strings s1 and s2 are not identical.

       s1         True if s1 is not the null string.  (Deprecated.)

       -n s1      True if the length of string s1 is non-zero.

       -z s1      True if the length of string s1 is zero.

       n1 -eq n2  True if the integers n1 and n2 are arithmetically equal.
                  Any of the comparisons -ne, -gt, -ge, -lt, or -le may be
                  used in place of -eq.  The (nonstandard) construct -l
                  string, meaning the length of string, may be used in place
                  of an integer.

       a -nt b    True if file a is newer than (modified after) file b.

       a -ot b    True if file a is older than (modified before) file b.

       f -older t True if file f is older than (modified before) time t.  If t
                  is a integer followed by the letters y(years), M(months),
                  d(days), h(hours), m(minutes), or s(seconds), it represents
                  current time minus the specified time.  If there is no
                  letter, it represents seconds since epoch.  You can also
                  concatenate mixed units.  For example, 3d12h means three
                  days and twelve hours ago.

       These primaries may be combined with the following operators:

       !         unary negation operator

       -o        binary or operator

       -a        binary and operator; higher precedence than -o

       ( expr )  parentheses for grouping.

       The primitives -b, -u, -g, and -s return false; they are recognized for
       compatibility with POSIX.

       Notice that all the operators and flags are separate arguments to test.
       Notice also that parentheses and equal signs are meaningful to rc and
       must be enclosed in quotes.

EXAMPLES
       Test is a dubious way to check for specific character strings: it uses
       a process to do what an rc(1) match or switch statement can do.  The
       first example is not only inefficient but wrong, because test
       understands the purported string "-c" as an option.

              if (test $1 '=' "-c") echo OK # wrong!

       A better way is

              if (~ $1 -c) echo OK

       Test whether is in the current directory.

              test -f abc -o -d abc

SOURCE
       /src/cmd/test.c

SEE ALSO
       rc(1)



                                                                       TEST(1)