virsh

VIRSH(1)                     Virtualization Support                     VIRSH(1)



NAME
       virsh - management user interface

SYNOPSIS
       virsh [OPTION]... [COMMAND_STRING]

       virsh [OPTION]... COMMAND [ARG]...

DESCRIPTION
       The virsh program is the main interface for managing virsh guest domains.
       The program can be used to create, pause, and shutdown domains. It can
       also be used to list current domains. Libvirt is a C toolkit to interact
       with the virtualization capabilities of recent versions of Linux (and
       other OSes). It is free software available under the GNU Lesser General
       Public License. Virtualization of the Linux Operating System means the
       ability to run multiple instances of Operating Systems concurrently on a
       single hardware system where the basic resources are driven by a Linux
       instance. The library aims at providing a long term stable C API.  It
       currently supports Xen, QEMU, KVM, LXC, OpenVZ, VirtualBox and VMware
       ESX.

       The basic structure of most virsh usage is:

          virsh [OPTION]... <command> <domain> [ARG]...

       Where command is one of the commands listed below; domain is the numeric
       domain id, or the domain name, or the domain UUID; and ARGS are command
       specific options.  There are a few exceptions to this rule in the cases
       where the command in question acts on all domains, the entire machine, or
       directly on the xen hypervisor.  Those exceptions will be clear for each
       of those commands.  Note: it is permissible to give numeric names to
       domains, however, doing so will result in a domain that can only be
       identified by domain id. In other words, if a numeric value is supplied
       it will be interpreted as a domain id, not as a name. Any command
       starting with # is treated as a comment and silently ignored, all other
       unrecognized commands are diagnosed.

       The virsh program can be used either to run one COMMAND by giving the
       command and its arguments on the shell command line, or a COMMAND_STRING
       which is a single shell argument consisting of multiple COMMAND actions
       and their arguments joined with whitespace and separated by semicolons or
       newlines between commands, where unquoted backslash-newline pairs are
       elided.  Within COMMAND_STRING, virsh understands the same single,
       double, and backslash escapes as the shell, although you must add another
       layer of shell escaping in creating the single shell argument, and any
       word starting with unquoted # begins a comment that ends at newline.  If
       no command is given in the command line, virsh will then start a minimal
       interpreter waiting for your commands, and the quit command will then
       exit the program.

       The virsh program understands the following OPTIONS.

       -c, --connect URI

       Connect to the specified URI, as if by the connect command, instead of
       the default connection.

       -d, --debug LEVEL

       Enable debug messages at integer LEVEL and above.  LEVEL can range from 0
       to 4 (default).  See the documentation of VIRSH_DEBUG environment
       variable below for the description of each LEVEL.

       • -e, --escape string

       Set alternative escape sequence for console command. By default, telnet's
       ^] is used. Allowed characters when using hat notation are: alphabetic
       character, @, [, ], , ^, _.

       • -h, --help

       Ignore all other arguments, and behave as if the help command were given
       instead.

       • -k, --keepalive-interval INTERVAL

       Set an INTERVAL (in seconds) for sending keepalive messages to check
       whether connection to the server is still alive.  Setting the interval to
       0 disables client keepalive mechanism.

       • -K, --keepalive-count COUNT

       Set a number of times keepalive message can be sent without getting an
       answer from the server without marking the connection dead.  There is no
       effect to this setting in case the INTERVAL is set to 0.

       • -l, --log FILE

       Output logging details to FILE.

       • -q, --quiet

       Avoid extra informational messages.

       • -r, --readonly

       Make the initial connection read-only, as if by the --readonly option of
       the connect command.

       • -t, --timing

       Output elapsed time information for each command.

       • -v, --version[=short]

       Ignore all other arguments, and prints the version of the libvirt library
       virsh is coming from

       • -V, --version=long

       Ignore all other arguments, and prints the version of the libvirt library
       virsh is coming from and which options and driver are compiled in.

NOTES
       Most virsh operations rely upon the libvirt library being able to connect
       to an already running libvirtd service.  This can usually be done using
       the command service libvirtd start.

       Most virsh commands require root privileges to run due to the
       communications channels used to talk to the hypervisor.  Running as non
       root will return an error.

       Most virsh commands act synchronously, except maybe shutdown, setvcpus
       and setmem. In those cases the fact that the virsh program returned, may
       not mean the action is complete and you must poll periodically to detect
       that the guest completed the operation.

       virsh strives for backward compatibility.  Although the help command only
       lists the preferred usage of a command, if an older version of virsh
       supported an alternate spelling of a command or option (such as
       --tunnelled instead of --tunneled), then scripts using that older
       spelling will continue to work.

       Several virsh commands take an optionally scaled integer; if no scale is
       provided, then the default is listed in the command (for historical
       reasons, some commands default to bytes, while other commands default to
       kibibytes).  The following case-insensitive suffixes can be used to
       select a specific scale:

          b, byte  byte      1
          KB       kilobyte  1,000
          k, KiB   kibibyte  1,024
          MB       megabyte  1,000,000
          M, MiB   mebibyte  1,048,576
          GB       gigabyte  1,000,000,000
          G, GiB   gibibyte  1,073,741,824
          TB       terabyte  1,000,000,000,000
          T, TiB   tebibyte  1,099,511,627,776
          PB       petabyte  1,000,000,000,000,000
          P, PiB   pebibyte  1,125,899,906,842,624
          EB       exabyte   1,000,000,000,000,000,000
          E, EiB   exbibyte  1,152,921,504,606,846,976

GENERIC COMMANDS
       The following commands are generic i.e. not specific to a domain.

   help
       Syntax:

          help [command-or-group]

       This lists each of the virsh commands.  When used without options, all
       commands are listed, one per line, grouped into related categories,
       displaying the keyword for each group.

       To display only commands for a specific group, give the keyword for that
       group as an option.  For example:

       Example 1:

          virsh # help host

          Host and Hypervisor (help keyword 'host'):
              capabilities                   capabilities
              cpu-models                     show the CPU models for an architecture
              connect                        (re)connect to hypervisor
              freecell                       NUMA free memory
              hostname                       print the hypervisor hostname
              qemu-attach                    Attach to existing QEMU process
              qemu-monitor-command           QEMU Monitor Command
              qemu-agent-command             QEMU Guest Agent Command
              sysinfo                        print the hypervisor sysinfo
              uri                            print the hypervisor canonical URI

       To display detailed information for a specific command, give its name as
       the option instead.  For example:

       Example 2:

          virsh # help list
            NAME
              list - list domains

            SYNOPSIS
              list [--inactive] [--all]

            DESCRIPTION
              Returns list of domains.

            OPTIONS
              --inactive       list inactive domains
              --all            list inactive & active domains

   quit, exit
       Syntax:

          quit
          exit

       quit this interactive terminal

   version
       Syntax:

          version [--daemon]

       Will print out the major version info about what this built from.  If
       --daemon is specified then the version of the libvirt daemon is included
       in the output.

       Example:

          $ virsh version
          Compiled against library: libvirt 1.2.3
          Using library: libvirt 1.2.3
          Using API: QEMU 1.2.3
          Running hypervisor: QEMU 2.0.50

          $ virsh version --daemon
          Compiled against library: libvirt 1.2.3
          Using library: libvirt 1.2.3
          Using API: QEMU 1.2.3
          Running hypervisor: QEMU 2.0.50
          Running against daemon: 1.2.6

   cd
       Syntax:

          cd [directory]

       Will change current directory to directory.  The default directory for
       the cd command is the home directory or, if there is no HOME variable in
       the environment, the root directory.

       This command is only available in interactive mode.

   pwd
       Syntax:

          pwd

       Will print the current directory.

   connect
       Syntax:

          connect [URI] [--readonly]

       (Re)-Connect to the hypervisor. When the shell is first started, this is
       automatically run with the URI parameter requested by the -c option on
       the command line. The URI parameter specifies how to connect to the
       hypervisor. The URI docs https://libvirt.org/uri.html list the values
       supported, but the most common are:

       • xen:///system

         this is used to connect to the local Xen hypervisor

       • qemu:///system

         connect locally as root to the daemon supervising QEMU and KVM domains

       • qemu:///session

         connect locally as a normal user to his own set of QEMU and KVM domains

       • lxc:///system

         connect to a local linux container

       To find the currently used URI, check the uri command documented below.

       For remote access see the URI docs https://libvirt.org/uri.html on how to
       make URIs. The --readonly option allows for read-only connection

   uri
       Syntax:

          uri

       Prints the hypervisor canonical URI, can be useful in shell mode.

   hostname
       Syntax:

          hostname

       Print the hypervisor hostname.

   sysinfo
       Syntax:

          sysinfo

       Print the XML representation of the hypervisor sysinfo, if available.

   nodeinfo
       Syntax:

          nodeinfo

       Returns basic information about the node, like number and type of CPU,
       and size of the physical memory. The output corresponds to virNodeInfo
       structure. Specifically, the "CPU socket(s)" field means number of CPU
       sockets per NUMA cell. The information libvirt displays is dependent upon
       what each architecture may provide.

   nodecpumap
       Syntax:

          nodecpumap [--pretty]

       Displays the node's total number of CPUs, the number of online CPUs and
       the list of online CPUs.

       With --pretty the online CPUs are printed as a range instead of a list.

   nodecpustats
       Syntax:

          nodecpustats [cpu] [--percent]

       Returns cpu stats of the node.  If cpu is specified, this will print the
       specified cpu statistics only.  If --percent is specified, this will
       print the percentage of each kind of cpu statistics during 1 second.

   nodememstats
       Syntax:

          nodememstats [cell]

       Returns memory stats of the node.  If cell is specified, this will print
       the specified cell statistics only.

   nodesuspend
       Syntax:

          nodesuspend [target] [duration]

       Puts the node (host machine) into a system-wide sleep state and schedule
       the node's Real-Time-Clock interrupt to resume the node after the time
       duration specified by duration is out.  target specifies the state to
       which the host will be suspended to, it can be "mem" (suspend to RAM),
       "disk" (suspend to disk), or "hybrid" (suspend to both RAM and disk).
       duration specifies the time duration in seconds for which the host has to
       be suspended, it should be at least 60 seconds.

   node-memory-tune
       Syntax:

          node-memory-tune [shm-pages-to-scan] [shm-sleep-millisecs] [shm-merge-across-nodes]

       Allows you to display or set the node memory parameters.
       shm-pages-to-scan can be used to set the number of pages to scan before
       the shared memory service goes to sleep; shm-sleep-millisecs can be used
       to set the number of millisecs the shared memory service should sleep
       before next scan; shm-merge-across-nodes specifies if pages from
       different numa nodes can be merged. When set to 0, only pages which
       physically reside in the memory area of same NUMA node can be merged.
       When set to 1, pages from all nodes can be merged. Default to 1.

       Note: Currently the "shared memory service" only means KSM (Kernel
       Samepage Merging).

   capabilities
       Syntax:

          capabilities

       Print an XML document describing the capabilities of the hypervisor we
       are currently connected to. This includes a section on the host
       capabilities in terms of CPU and features, and a set of description for
       each kind of guest which can be virtualized. For a more complete
       description see:

       https://libvirt.org/formatcaps.html

       The XML also show the NUMA topology information if available.

   domcapabilities
       Syntax:

          domcapabilities [virttype] [emulatorbin] [arch] [machine]

       Print an XML document describing the domain capabilities for the
       hypervisor we are connected to using information either sourced from an
       existing domain or taken from the virsh capabilities output. This may be
       useful if you intend to create a new domain and are curious if for
       instance it could make use of VFIO by creating a domain for the
       hypervisor with a specific emulator and architecture.

       Each hypervisor will have different requirements regarding which options
       are required and which are optional. A hypervisor can support providing a
       default value for any of the options.

       The virttype option specifies the virtualization type used. The value to
       be used is either from the 'type' attribute of the <domain/> top level
       element from the domain XML or the 'type' attribute found within each
       <guest/> element from the virsh capabilities output.  The emulatorbin
       option specifies the path to the emulator. The value to be used is either
       the <emulator> element in the domain XML or the virsh capabilities
       output. The arch option specifies the architecture to be used for the
       domain. The value to be used is either the "arch" attribute from the
       domain's XML <os/> element and <type/> subelement or the "name" attribute
       of an <arch/> element from the virsh capabililites output. The machine
       specifies the machine type for the emulator. The value to be used is
       either the "machine" attribute from the domain's XML <os/> element and
       <type/> subelement or one from a list of machines from the virsh
       capabilities output for a specific architecture and domain type.

       For the QEMU hypervisor, a virttype of either 'qemu' or 'kvm' must be
       supplied along with either the emulatorbin or arch in order to generate
       output for the default machine.  Supplying a machine value will generate
       output for the specific machine.

   pool-capabilities
       Syntax:

          pool-capabilities

       Print an XML document describing the storage pool capabilities for the
       connected storage driver. This may be useful if you intend to create a
       new storage pool and need to know the available pool types and supported
       storage pool source and target volume formats as well as the required
       source elements to create the pool.

   inject-nmi
       Syntax:

          inject-nmi domain

       Inject NMI to the guest.

   list
       Syntax:

          list [--inactive | --all]
               [--managed-save] [--title]
               { [--table] | --name | --uuid | --id }
               [--persistent] [--transient]
               [--with-managed-save] [--without-managed-save]
               [--autostart] [--no-autostart]
               [--with-snapshot] [--without-snapshot]
               [--with-checkpoint] [--without-checkpoint]
               [--state-running] [--state-paused]
               [--state-shutoff] [--state-other]

       Prints information about existing domains.  If no options are specified
       it prints out information about running domains.

       Example 1:

       An example format for the list is as follows:

          ``virsh`` list
            Id    Name                           State
          ----------------------------------------------------
            0     Domain-0                       running
            2     fedora                         paused

       Name is the name of the domain.  ID the domain numeric id.  State is the
       run state (see below).

       STATES

       The State field lists what state each domain is currently in. A domain
       can be in one of the following possible states:

       • running

         The domain is currently running on a CPU

       • idle

         The domain is idle, and not running or runnable.  This can be caused
         because the domain is waiting on IO (a traditional wait state) or has
         gone to sleep because there was nothing else for it to do.

       • paused

         The domain has been paused, usually occurring through the administrator
         running virsh suspend.  When in a paused state the domain will still
         consume allocated resources like memory, but will not be eligible for
         scheduling by the hypervisor.

       • in shutdown

         The domain is in the process of shutting down, i.e. the guest operating
         system has been notified and should be in the process of stopping its
         operations gracefully.

       • shut off

         The domain is not running.  Usually this indicates the domain has been
         shut down completely, or has not been started.

       • crashed

         The domain has crashed, which is always a violent ending.  Usually this
         state can only occur if the domain has been configured not to restart
         on crash.

       • pmsuspended

         The domain has been suspended by guest power management, e.g. entered
         into s3 state.

       Normally only active domains are listed. To list inactive domains specify
       --inactive or --all to list both active and inactive domains.

       Filtering

       To further filter the list of domains you may specify one or more of
       filtering flags supported by the list command. These flags are grouped by
       function.  Specifying one or more flags from a group enables the filter
       group. Note that some combinations of flags may yield no results.
       Supported filtering flags and groups:

   Persistence
       Flag --persistent is used to include persistent guests in the returned
       list. To include transient guests specify --transient.

   Existence of managed save image
       To list domains having a managed save image specify flag
       --with-managed-save. For domains that don't have a managed save image
       specify --without-managed-save.

   Domain state
       The following filter flags select a domain by its state: --state-running
       for running domains, --state-paused  for paused domains, --state-shutoff
       for turned off domains and --state-other for all other states as a
       fallback.

   Autostarting domains
       To list autostarting domains use the flag --autostart. To list domains
       with this feature disabled use --no-autostart.

   Snapshot existence
       Domains that have snapshot images can be listed using flag
       --with-snapshot, domains without a snapshot --without-snapshot.

   Checkpoint existence
       Domains that have checkpoints can be listed using flag --with-checkpoint,
       domains without a checkpoint --without-checkpoint.

       When talking to older servers, this command is forced to use a series of
       API calls with an inherent race, where a domain might not be listed or
       might appear more than once if it changed state between calls while the
       list was being collected.  Newer servers do not have this problem.

       If --managed-save is specified, then domains that have managed save state
       (only possible if they are in the shut off state, so you need to specify
       --inactive or --all to actually list them) will instead show as saved in
       the listing. This flag is usable only with the default --table output.
       Note that this flag does not filter the list of domains.

       If --name is specified, domain names are printed instead of the table
       formatted one per line. If --uuid is specified domain's UUID's are
       printed instead of names. If --id is specified then domain's ID's are
       printed indead of names. However, it is possible to combine --name,
       --uuid and --id to select only desired fields for printing. Flag --table
       specifies that the legacy table-formatted output should be used, but it
       is mutually exclusive with --name, --uuid and --id. This is the default
       and will be used if neither of --name, --uuid or --id is specified. If
       neither --name nor --uuid is specified, but --id is, then only active
       domains are listed, even with the --all parameter as otherwise the output
       would just contain bunch of lines with just -1.

       If --title is specified, then the short domain description (title) is
       printed in an extra column. This flag is usable only with the default
       --table output.

       Example 2:

          $ virsh list --title
            Id    Name        State      Title
           -------------------------------------------
            0     Domain-0    running    Mailserver 1
            2     fedora      paused

   freecell
       Syntax:

          freecell [{ [--cellno] cellno | --all }]

       Prints the available amount of memory on the machine or within a NUMA
       cell.  The freecell command can provide one of three different displays
       of available memory on the machine depending on the options specified.
       With no options, it displays the total free memory on the machine.  With
       the --all option, it displays the free memory in each cell and the total
       free memory on the machine.  Finally, with a numeric argument or with
       --cellno plus a cell number it will display the free memory for the
       specified cell only.

   freepages
       Syntax:

          freepages [{ [--cellno] cellno [--pagesize] pagesize |     --all }]

       Prints the available amount of pages within a NUMA cell. cellno refers to
       the NUMA cell you're interested in. pagesize is a scaled integer (see
       NOTES above).  Alternatively, if --all is used, info on each possible
       combination of NUMA cell and page size is printed out.

   allocpages
       Syntax:

          allocpages [--pagesize] pagesize [--pagecount] pagecount [[--cellno] cellno] [--add] [--all]

       Change the size of pages pool of pagesize on the host. If --add is
       specified, then pagecount pages are added into the pool. However, if
       --add wasn't specified, then the pagecount is taken as the new absolute
       size of the pool (this may be used to free some pages and size the pool
       down). The cellno modifier can be used to narrow the modification down to
       a single host NUMA cell. On the other end of spectrum lies --all which
       executes the modification on all NUMA cells.

   cpu-baseline
       Syntax:

          cpu-baseline FILE [--features] [--migratable]

       Compute baseline CPU which will be supported by all host CPUs given in
       <file>.  (See hypervisor-cpu-baseline command to get a CPU which can be
       provided by a specific hypervisor.) The list of host CPUs is built by
       extracting all <cpu> elements from the <file>. Thus, the <file> can
       contain either a set of <cpu> elements separated by new lines or even a
       set of complete <capabilities> elements printed by capabilities command.
       If --features is specified, then the resulting XML description will
       explicitly include all features that make up the CPU, without this option
       features that are part of the CPU model will not be listed in the XML
       description.   If --migratable is specified, features that block
       migration will not be included in the resulting CPU.

   cpu-compare
       Syntax:

          cpu-compare FILE [--error] [--validate]

       Compare CPU definition from XML <file> with host CPU. (See
       hypervisor-cpu-compare command for comparing the CPU definition with the
       CPU which a specific hypervisor is able to provide on the host.) The XML
       <file> may contain either host or guest CPU definition. The host CPU
       definition is the <cpu> element and its contents as printed by
       capabilities command. The guest CPU definition is the <cpu> element and
       its contents from domain XML definition or the CPU definition created
       from the host CPU model found in domain capabilities XML (printed by
       domcapabilities command). In addition to the <cpu> element itself, this
       command accepts full domain XML, capabilities XML, or domain capabilities
       XML containing the CPU definition. For more information on guest CPU
       definition see: https://libvirt.org/formatdomain.html#elementsCPU. If
       --error is specified, the command will return an error when the given CPU
       is incompatible with host CPU and a message providing more details about
       the incompatibility will be printed out. If --validate is specified,
       validates the format of the XML document against an internal RNG schema.

   cpu-models
       Syntax:

          cpu-models arch

       Print the list of CPU models known by libvirt for the specified
       architecture.  Whether a specific hypervisor is able to create a domain
       which uses any of the printed CPU models is a separate question which can
       be answered by looking at the domain capabilities XML returned by
       domcapabilities command.  Moreover, for some architectures libvirt does
       not know any CPU models and the usable CPU models are only limited by the
       hypervisor. This command will print that all CPU models are accepted for
       these architectures and the actual list of supported CPU models can be
       checked in the domain capabilities XML.

   hypervisor-cpu-compare
       Syntax:

          hypervisor-cpu-compare FILE [virttype] [emulator] [arch] [machine] [--error] [--validate]

       Compare CPU definition from XML <file> with the CPU the hypervisor is
       able to provide on the host. (This is different from cpu-compare which
       compares the CPU definition with the host CPU without considering any
       specific hypervisor and its abilities.)

       The XML FILE may contain either a host or guest CPU definition. The host
       CPU definition is the <cpu> element and its contents as printed by the
       capabilities command. The guest CPU definition is the <cpu> element and
       its contents from the domain XML definition or the CPU definition created
       from the host CPU model found in the domain capabilities XML (printed by
       the domcapabilities command). In addition to the <cpu> element itself,
       this command accepts full domain XML, capabilities XML, or domain
       capabilities XML containing the CPU definition. For more information on
       guest CPU definition see:
       https://libvirt.org/formatdomain.html#elementsCPU.

       The virttype option specifies the virtualization type (usable in the
       'type' attribute of the <domain> top level element from the domain XML).
       emulator specifies the path to the emulator, arch specifies the CPU
       architecture, and machine specifies the machine type. If --error is
       specified, the command will return an error when the given CPU is
       incompatible with the host CPU and a message providing more details about
       the incompatibility will be printed out.  If --validate is specified,
       validates the format of the XML document against an internal RNG schema.

   hypervisor-cpu-baseline
       Syntax:

          hypervisor-cpu-baseline FILE [virttype] [emulator] [arch] [machine] [--features] [--migratable]

       Compute a baseline CPU which will be compatible with all CPUs defined in
       an XML file and with the CPU the hypervisor is able to provide on the
       host. (This is different from cpu-baseline which does not consider any
       hypervisor abilities when computing the baseline CPU.)

       The XML FILE may contain either host or guest CPU definitions describing
       the host CPU model. The host CPU definition is the <cpu> element and its
       contents as printed by capabilities command. The guest CPU definition may
       be created from the host CPU model found in domain capabilities XML
       (printed by domcapabilities command). In addition to the <cpu> elements,
       this command accepts full capabilities XMLs, or domain capabilities XMLs
       containing the CPU definitions. It is recommended to use only the CPU
       definitions from domain capabilities, as on some architectures using the
       host CPU definition may either fail or provide unexpected results.

       When FILE contains only a single CPU definition, the command will print
       the same CPU with restrictions imposed by the capabilities of the
       hypervisor.  Specifically, running th virsh hypervisor-cpu-baseline
       command with no additional options on the result of virsh domcapabilities
       will transform the host CPU model from domain capabilities XML to a form
       directly usable in domain XML.

       The virttype option specifies the virtualization type (usable in the
       'type' attribute of the <domain> top level element from the domain XML).
       emulator specifies the path to the emulator, arch specifies the CPU
       architecture, and machine specifies the machine type. If --features is
       specified, then the resulting XML description will explicitly include all
       features that make up the CPU, without this option features that are part
       of the CPU model will not be listed in the XML description. If
       --migratable is specified, features that block migration will not be
       included in the resulting CPU.

DOMAIN COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate domains directly, as stated previously
       most commands take domain as the first parameter. The domain can be
       specified as a short integer, a name or a full UUID.

   autostart
       Syntax:

          autostart [--disable] domain

       Configure a domain to be automatically started at boot.

       The option --disable disables autostarting.

   blkdeviotune
       Syntax:

          blkdeviotune domain device [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]
             [[total-bytes-sec] | [read-bytes-sec] [write-bytes-sec]]
             [[total-iops-sec] | [read-iops-sec] [write-iops-sec]]
             [[total-bytes-sec-max] | [read-bytes-sec-max] [write-bytes-sec-max]]
             [[total-iops-sec-max] | [read-iops-sec-max] [write-iops-sec-max]]
             [[total-bytes-sec-max-length] |
              [read-bytes-sec-max-length] [write-bytes-sec-max-length]]
             [[total-iops-sec-max-length] |
              [read-iops-sec-max-length] [write-iops-sec-max-length]]
             [size-iops-sec] [group-name]

       Set or query the block disk io parameters for a block device of domain.
       device specifies a unique target name (<target dev='name'/>) or source
       file (<source file='name'/>) for one of the disk devices attached to
       domain (see also domblklist for listing these names).

       If no limit is specified, it will query current I/O limits setting.
       Otherwise, alter the limits with these flags: --total-bytes-sec specifies
       total throughput limit as a scaled integer, the default being bytes per
       second if no suffix is specified.  --read-bytes-sec specifies read
       throughput limit as a scaled integer, the default being bytes per second
       if no suffix is specified.  --write-bytes-sec specifies write throughput
       limit as a scaled integer, the default being bytes per second if no
       suffix is specified.  --total-iops-sec specifies total I/O operations
       limit per second.  --read-iops-sec specifies read I/O operations limit
       per second.  --write-iops-sec specifies write I/O operations limit per
       second.  --total-bytes-sec-max specifies maximum total throughput limit
       as a scaled integer, the default being bytes per second if no suffix is
       specified --read-bytes-sec-max specifies maximum read throughput limit as
       a scaled integer, the default being bytes per second if no suffix is
       specified.  --write-bytes-sec-max specifies maximum write throughput
       limit as a scaled integer, the default being bytes per second if no
       suffix is specified.  --total-iops-sec-max specifies maximum total I/O
       operations limit per second.  --read-iops-sec-max specifies maximum read
       I/O operations limit per second.  --write-iops-sec-max specifies maximum
       write I/O operations limit per second.  --total-bytes-sec-max-length
       specifies duration in seconds to allow maximum total throughput limit.
       --read-bytes-sec-max-length specifies duration in seconds to allow
       maximum read throughput limit.  --write-bytes-sec-max-length specifies
       duration in seconds to allow maximum write throughput limit.
       --total-iops-sec-max-length specifies duration in seconds to allow
       maximum total I/O operations limit.  --read-iops-sec-max-length specifies
       duration in seconds to allow maximum read I/O operations limit.
       --write-iops-sec-max-length specifies duration in seconds to allow
       maximum write I/O operations limit.  --size-iops-sec specifies size I/O
       operations limit per second.  --group-name specifies group name to share
       I/O quota between multiple drives.  For a QEMU domain, if no name is
       provided, then the default is to have a single group for each device.

       Older versions of virsh only accepted these options with underscore
       instead of dash, as in --total_bytes_sec.

       Bytes and iops values are independent, but setting only one value (such
       as --read-bytes-sec) resets the other two in that category to unlimited.
       An explicit 0 also clears any limit.  A non-zero value for a given total
       cannot be mixed with non-zero values for read or write.

       It is up to the hypervisor to determine how to handle the length values.
       For the QEMU hypervisor, if an I/O limit value or maximum value is set,
       then the default value of 1 second will be displayed. Supplying a 0 will
       reset the value back to the default.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If --current is
       specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  When setting the disk io parameters both
       --live and --config flags may be given, but --current is exclusive. For
       querying only one of --live, --config or --current can be specified. If
       no flag is specified, behavior is different depending on hypervisor.

   blkiotune
       Syntax:

          blkiotune domain [--weight weight] [--device-weights device-weights]
             [--device-read-iops-sec device-read-iops-sec]
             [--device-write-iops-sec device-write-iops-sec]
             [--device-read-bytes-sec device-read-bytes-sec]
             [--device-write-bytes-sec device-write-bytes-sec]
             [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Display or set the blkio parameters. QEMU/KVM supports --weight.
       --weight is in range [100, 1000]. After kernel 2.6.39, the value could be
       in the range [10, 1000].

       device-weights is a single string listing one or more device/weight
       pairs, in the format of /path/to/device,weight,/path/to/device,weight.
       Each weight is in the range [100, 1000], [10, 1000] after kernel 2.6.39,
       or the value 0 to remove that device from per-device listings.  Only the
       devices listed in the string are modified; any existing per-device
       weights for other devices remain unchanged.

       device-read-iops-sec is a single string listing one or more
       device/read_iops_sec pairs, int the format of
       /path/to/device,read_iops_sec,/path/to/device,read_iops_sec.  Each
       read_iops_sec is a number which type is unsigned int, value 0 to remove
       that device from per-device listing.  Only the devices listed in the
       string are modified; any existing per-device read_iops_sec for other
       devices remain unchanged.

       device-write-iops-sec is a single string listing one or more
       device/write_iops_sec pairs, int the format of
       /path/to/device,write_iops_sec,/path/to/device,write_iops_sec.  Each
       write_iops_sec is a number which type is unsigned int, value 0 to remove
       that device from per-device listing.  Only the devices listed in the
       string are modified; any existing per-device write_iops_sec for other
       devices remain unchanged.

       device-read-bytes-sec is a single string listing one or more
       device/read_bytes_sec pairs, int the format of
       /path/to/device,read_bytes_sec,/path/to/device,read_bytes_sec.  Each
       read_bytes_sec is a number which type is unsigned long long, value 0 to
       remove that device from per-device listing.  Only the devices listed in
       the string are modified; any existing per-device read_bytes_sec for other
       devices remain unchanged.

       device-write-bytes-sec is a single string listing one or more
       device/write_bytes_sec pairs, int the format of
       /path/to/device,write_bytes_sec,/path/to/device,write_bytes_sec.  Each
       write_bytes_sec is a number which type is unsigned long long, value 0 to
       remove that device from per-device listing.  Only the devices listed in
       the string are modified; any existing per-device write_bytes_sec for
       other devices remain unchanged.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If --current is
       specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. If no flag is specified, behavior is
       different depending on hypervisor.

   blockcommit
       Syntax:

          blockcommit domain path [bandwidth] [--bytes] [base]
             [--shallow] [top] [--delete] [--keep-relative]
             [--wait [--async] [--verbose]] [--timeout seconds]
             [--active] [{--pivot | --keep-overlay}]

       Reduce the length of a backing image chain, by committing changes at the
       top of the chain (snapshot or delta files) into backing images.  By
       default, this command attempts to flatten the entire chain.  If base
       and/or top are specified as files within the backing chain, then the
       operation is constrained to committing just that portion of the chain;
       --shallow can be used instead of base to specify the immediate backing
       file of the resulting top image to be committed.  The files being
       committed are rendered invalid, possibly as soon as the operation starts;
       using the --delete flag will attempt to remove these invalidated files at
       the successful completion of the commit operation. When the
       --keep-relative flag is used, the backing file paths will be kept
       relative.

       When top is omitted or specified as the active image, it is also possible
       to specify --active to trigger a two-phase active commit. In the first
       phase, top is copied into base and the job can only be canceled, with top
       still containing data not yet in base. In the second phase, top and base
       remain identical until a call to blockjob with the --abort flag (keeping
       top as the active image that tracks changes from that point in time) or
       the --pivot flag (making base the new active image and invalidating top).

       By default, this command returns as soon as possible, and data for the
       entire disk is committed in the background; the progress of the operation
       can be checked with blockjob.  However, if --wait is specified, then this
       command will block until the operation completes (or for --active, enters
       the second phase), or until the operation is canceled because the
       optional timeout in seconds elapses or SIGINT is sent (usually with
       Ctrl-C).  Using --verbose along with --wait will produce periodic status
       updates.  If job cancellation is triggered, --async will return control
       to the user as fast as possible, otherwise the command may continue to
       block a little while longer until the job is done cleaning up.  Using
       --pivot is shorthand for combining --active --wait with an automatic
       blockjob --pivot; and using --keep-overlay is shorthand for combining
       --active --wait with an automatic blockjob --abort.

       path specifies fully-qualified path of the disk; it corresponds to a
       unique target name (<target dev='name'/>) or source file (<source
       file='name'/>) for one of the disk devices attached to domain (see also
       domblklist for listing these names).  bandwidth specifies copying
       bandwidth limit in MiB/s, although for QEMU, it may be non-zero only for
       an online domain. For further information on the bandwidth argument see
       the corresponding section for the blockjob command.

   blockcopy
       Syntax:

          blockcopy domain path { dest [format] [--blockdev] | --xml file }
             [--shallow] [--reuse-external] [bandwidth]
             [--wait [--async] [--verbose]] [{--pivot | --finish}]
             [--timeout seconds] [granularity] [buf-size] [--bytes]
             [--transient-job]

       Copy a disk backing image chain to a destination.  Either dest as the
       destination file name, or --xml with the name of an XML file containing a
       top-level <disk> element describing the destination, must be present.
       Additionally, if dest is given, format should be specified to declare the
       format of the destination (if format is omitted, then libvirt will reuse
       the format of the source, or with --reuse-external will be forced to
       probe the destination format, which could be a potential security hole).
       The command supports --raw as a boolean flag synonym for --format=raw.
       When using dest, the destination is treated as a regular file unless
       --blockdev is used to signal that it is a block device. By default, this
       command flattens the entire chain; but if --shallow is specified, the
       copy shares the backing chain.

       If --reuse-external is specified, then the destination must exist and
       have sufficient space to hold the copy. If --shallow is used in
       conjunction with --reuse-external then the pre-created image must have
       guest visible contents identical to guest visible contents of the backing
       file of the original image. This may be used to modify the backing file
       names on the destination.

       By default, the copy job runs in the background, and consists of two
       phases.  Initially, the job must copy all data from the source, and
       during this phase, the job can only be canceled to revert back to the
       source disk, with no guarantees about the destination.  After this phase
       completes, both the source and the destination remain mirrored until a
       call to blockjob with the --abort and --pivot flags pivots over to the
       copy, or a call without --pivot leaves the destination as a faithful copy
       of that point in time.  However, if --wait is specified, then this
       command will block until the mirroring phase begins, or cancel the
       operation if the optional timeout in seconds elapses or SIGINT is sent
       (usually with Ctrl-C).  Using --verbose along with --wait will produce
       periodic status updates.  Using --pivot (similar to blockjob --pivot) or
       --finish (similar to blockjob --abort) implies --wait, and will
       additionally end the job cleanly rather than leaving things in the
       mirroring phase.  If job cancellation is triggered by timeout or by
       --finish, --async will return control to the user as fast as possible,
       otherwise the command may continue to block a little while longer until
       the job has actually cancelled.

       path specifies fully-qualified path of the disk.  bandwidth specifies
       copying bandwidth limit in MiB/s. Specifying a negative value is
       interpreted as an unsigned long long value that might be essentially
       unlimited, but more likely would overflow; it is safer to use 0 for that
       purpose. For further information on the bandwidth argument see the
       corresponding section for the blockjob command.  Specifying granularity
       allows fine-tuning of the granularity that will be copied when a dirty
       region is detected; larger values trigger less I/O overhead but may end
       up copying more data overall (the default value is usually correct);
       hypervisors may restrict this to be a power of two or fall within a
       certain range. Specifying buf-size will control how much data can be
       simultaneously in-flight during the copy; larger values use more memory
       but may allow faster completion (the default value is usually correct).

       --transient-job allows specifying that the user does not require the job
       to be recovered if the VM crashes or is turned off before the job
       completes. This flag removes the restriction of copy jobs to transient
       domains if that restriction is applied by the hypervisor.

   blockjob
       Syntax:

          blockjob domain path { [--abort] [--async] [--pivot] |
             [--info] [--raw] [--bytes] | [bandwidth] }

       Manage active block operations.  There are three mutually-exclusive
       modes: --info, bandwidth, and --abort.  --async and --pivot imply abort
       mode; --raw implies info mode; and if no mode was given, --info mode is
       assumed.

       path specifies fully-qualified path of the disk; it corresponds to a
       unique target name (<target dev='name'/>) or source file (<source
       file='name'/>) for one of the disk devices attached to domain (see also
       domblklist for listing these names).

       In --abort mode, the active job on the specified disk will be aborted.
       If --async is also specified, this command will return immediately,
       rather than waiting for the cancellation to complete.  If --pivot is
       specified, this requests that an active copy or active commit job be
       pivoted over to the new image.

       In --info mode, the active job information on the specified disk will be
       printed.  By default, the output is a single human-readable summary line;
       this format may change in future versions.  Adding --raw lists each field
       of the struct, in a stable format.  If the --bytes flag is set, then the
       command errors out if the server could not supply bytes/s resolution;
       when omitting the flag, raw output is listed in MiB/s and human-readable
       output automatically selects the best resolution supported by the server.

       bandwidth can be used to set bandwidth limit for the active job in MiB/s.
       If --bytes is specified then the bandwidth value is interpreted in
       bytes/s. Specifying a negative value is interpreted as an unsigned long
       value or essentially unlimited. The hypervisor can choose whether to
       reject the value or convert it to the maximum value allowed. Optionally a
       scaled positive number may be used as bandwidth (see NOTES above). Using
       --bytes with a scaled value permits a finer granularity to be selected.
       A scaled value used without --bytes will be rounded down to MiB/s. Note
       that the --bytes may be unsupported by the hypervisor.

       Note that the progress reported for blockjobs corresponding to a
       pull-mode backup don't report progress of the backup but rather usage of
       temporary space required for the backup.

   blockpull
       Syntax:

          blockpull domain path [bandwidth] [--bytes] [base]
             [--wait [--verbose] [--timeout seconds] [--async]]
             [--keep-relative]

       Populate a disk from its backing image chain. By default, this command
       flattens the entire chain; but if base is specified, containing the name
       of one of the backing files in the chain, then that file becomes the new
       backing file and only the intermediate portion of the chain is pulled.
       Once all requested data from the backing image chain has been pulled, the
       disk no longer depends on that portion of the backing chain.

       By default, this command returns as soon as possible, and data for the
       entire disk is pulled in the background; the progress of the operation
       can be checked with blockjob.  However, if --wait is specified, then this
       command will block until the operation completes, or cancel the operation
       if the optional timeout in seconds elapses or SIGINT is sent (usually
       with Ctrl-C).  Using --verbose along with --wait will produce periodic
       status updates.  If job cancellation is triggered, --async will return
       control to the user as fast as possible, otherwise the command may
       continue to block a little while longer until the job is done cleaning
       up.

       Using the --keep-relative flag will keep the backing chain names
       relative.

       path specifies fully-qualified path of the disk; it corresponds to a
       unique target name (<target dev='name'/>) or source file (<source
       file='name'/>) for one of the disk devices attached to domain (see also
       domblklist for listing these names).  bandwidth specifies copying
       bandwidth limit in MiB/s. For further information on the bandwidth
       argument see the corresponding section for the blockjob command.

   blockresize
       Syntax:

          blockresize domain path size

       Resize a block device of domain while the domain is running, path
       specifies the absolute path of the block device; it corresponds to a
       unique target name (<target dev='name'/>) or source file (<source
       file='name'/>) for one of the disk devices attached to domain (see also
       domblklist for listing these names).

       size is a scaled integer (see NOTES above) which defaults to KiB (blocks
       of 1024 bytes) if there is no suffix.  You must use a suffix of "B" to
       get bytes (note that for historical reasons, this differs from vol-resize
       which defaults to bytes without a suffix).

   console
       Syntax:

          console domain [devname] [--safe] [--force]

       Connect the virtual serial console for the guest. The optional devname
       parameter refers to the device alias of an alternate console, serial or
       parallel device configured for the guest.  If omitted, the primary
       console will be opened.

       If the flag --safe is specified, the connection is only attempted if the
       driver supports safe console handling. This flag specifies that the
       server has to ensure exclusive access to console devices. Optionally the
       --force flag may be specified, requesting to disconnect any existing
       sessions, such as in a case of a broken connection.

   cpu-stats
       Syntax:

          cpu-stats domain [--total] [start] [count]

       Provide cpu statistics information of a domain. The domain should be
       running. Default it shows stats for all CPUs, and a total. Use --total
       for only the total stats, start for only the per-cpu stats of the CPUs
       from start, count for only count CPUs' stats.

   create
       Syntax:

          create FILE [--console] [--paused] [--autodestroy]
             [--pass-fds N,M,...] [--validate]

       Create a domain from an XML <file>. Optionally, --validate option can be
       passed to validate the format of the input XML file against an internal
       RNG schema (identical to using virt-xml-validate(1) tool). Domains
       created using this command are going to be either transient (temporary
       ones that will vanish once destroyed) or existing persistent guests that
       will run with one-time use configuration, leaving the persistent XML
       untouched (this can come handy during an automated testing of various
       configurations all based on the original XML).  See the example below for
       usage demonstration.

       The domain will be paused if the --paused option is used and supported by
       the driver; otherwise it will be running. If --console is requested,
       attach to the console after creation.  If --autodestroy is requested,
       then the guest will be automatically destroyed when virsh closes its
       connection to libvirt, or otherwise exits.

       If --pass-fds is specified, the argument is a comma separated list of
       open file descriptors which should be pass on into the guest. The file
       descriptors will be re-numbered in the guest, starting from 3. This is
       only supported with container based virtualization.

       Example:

       1. prepare a template from an existing domain (skip directly to 3a if
          writing one from scratch)

             # virsh dumpxml <domain> > domain.xml

       2. edit the template using an editor of your choice and:

          a. DO CHANGE! <name> and <uuid> (<uuid> can also be removed), or

          b. DON'T CHANGE! either <name> or <uuid>

             # $EDITOR domain.xml

       3. create a domain from domain.xml, depending on whether following 2a or
          2b respectively:

          a. the domain is going to be transient

          b. an existing persistent guest will run with a modified one-time
             configuration

             # virsh create domain.xml

   define
       Syntax:

          define FILE [--validate]

       Define a domain from an XML <file>. Optionally, the format of the input
       XML file can be validated against an internal RNG schema with --validate
       (identical to using virt-xml-validate(1) tool). The domain definition is
       registered but not started.  If domain is already running, the changes
       will take effect on the next boot.

   desc
       Syntax:

          desc domain [[--live] [--config] |
             [--current]] [--title] [--edit] [--new-desc
             New description or title message]

       Show or modify description and title of a domain. These values are user
       fields that allow storing arbitrary textual data to allow easy
       identification of domains. Title should be short, although it's not
       enforced.  (See also metadata that works with XML based domain metadata.)

       Flags --live or --config select whether this command works on live or
       persistent definitions of the domain. If both --live and --config are
       specified, the --config option takes precedence on getting the current
       description and both live configuration and config are updated while
       setting the description. --current is exclusive and implied if none of
       these was specified.

       Flag --edit specifies that an editor with the contents of current
       description or title should be opened and the contents saved back
       afterwards.

       Flag --title selects operation on the title field instead of description.

       If neither of --edit and --new-desc are specified the note or description
       is displayed instead of being modified.

   destroy
       Syntax:

          destroy domain [--graceful]

       Immediately terminate the domain domain.  This doesn't give the domain OS
       any chance to react, and it's the equivalent of ripping the power cord
       out on a physical machine.  In most cases you will want to use the
       shutdown command instead.  However, this does not delete any storage
       volumes used by the guest, and if the domain is persistent, it can be
       restarted later.

       If domain is transient, then the metadata of any snapshots will be lost
       once the guest stops running, but the snapshot contents still exist, and
       a new domain with the same name and UUID can restore the snapshot
       metadata with snapshot-create.  Similarly, the metadata of any
       checkpoints will be lost, but can be restored with checkpoint-create.

       If --graceful is specified, don't resort to extreme measures (e.g.
       SIGKILL) when the guest doesn't stop after a reasonable timeout; return
       an error instead.

   domblkerror
       Syntax:

          domblkerror domain

       Show errors on block devices.  This command usually comes handy when
       domstate command says that a domain was paused due to I/O error.  The
       domblkerror command lists all block devices in error state and the error
       seen on each of them.

   domblkinfo
       Syntax:

          domblkinfo domain [block-device --all] [--human]

       Get block device size info for a domain.  A block-device corresponds to a
       unique target name (<target dev='name'/>) or source file (<source
       file='name'/>) for one of the disk devices attached to domain (see also
       domblklist for listing these names). If --human is set, the output will
       have a human readable output.  If --all is set, the output will be a
       table showing all block devices size info associated with domain.  The
       --all option takes precedence of the others.

   domblklist
       Syntax:

          domblklist domain [--inactive] [--details]

       Print a table showing the brief information of all block devices
       associated with domain. If --inactive is specified, query the block
       devices that will be used on the next boot, rather than those currently
       in use by a running domain. If --details is specified, disk type and
       device value will also be printed. Other contexts that require a block
       device name (such as domblkinfo or snapshot-create for disk snapshots)
       will accept either target or unique source names printed by this command.

   domblkstat
       Syntax:

          domblkstat domain [block-device] [--human]

       Get device block stats for a running domain.  A block-device corresponds
       to a unique target name (<target dev='name'/>) or source file (<source
       file='name'/>) for one of the disk devices attached to domain (see also
       domblklist for listing these names). On a LXC or QEMU domain, omitting
       the block-device yields device block stats summarily for the entire
       domain.

       Use --human for a more human readable output.

       Availability of these fields depends on hypervisor. Unsupported fields
       are missing from the output. Other fields may appear if communicating
       with a newer version of libvirtd.

       Explanation of fields (fields appear in the following order):

       • rd_req            - count of read operations

       • rd_bytes          - count of read bytes

       • wr_req            - count of write operations

       • wr_bytes          - count of written bytes

       • errs              - error count

       • flush_operations  - count of flush operations

       • rd_total_times    - total time read operations took (ns)

       • wr_total_times    - total time write operations took (ns)

       • flush_total_times - total time flush operations took (ns)

       • <-- other fields provided by hypervisor -->

   domblkthreshold
       Syntax:

          domblkthreshold domain dev threshold

       Set the threshold value for delivering the block-threshold event. dev
       specifies the disk device target or backing chain element of given device
       using the 'target[1]' syntax. threshold is a scaled value of the offset.
       If the block device should write beyond that offset the event will be
       delivered.

   domcontrol
       Syntax:

          domcontrol domain

       Returns state of an interface to VMM used to control a domain.  For
       states other than "ok" or "error" the command also prints number of
       seconds elapsed since the control interface entered its current state.

   domdirtyrate-calc
       Syntax:

          domdirtyrate-calc <domain> [--seconds <sec>]

       Calculate an active domain's memory dirty rate which may be expected by
       user in order to decide whether it's proper to be migrated out or not.
       The seconds parameter can be used to calculate dirty rate in a specific
       time which allows 60s at most now and would be default to 1s if missing.
       The calculated dirty rate information is available by calling 'domstats
       --dirtyrate'.

   domdisplay
       Syntax:

          domdisplay domain [--include-password] [[--type] type] [--all]

       Output a URI which can be used to connect to the graphical display of the
       domain via VNC, SPICE or RDP.  The particular graphical display type can
       be selected using the type parameter (e.g. "vnc", "spice", "rdp").  If
       --include-password is specified, the SPICE channel password will be
       included in the URI. If --all is specified, then all show all possible
       graphical displays, for a VM could have more than one graphical displays.

   domfsfreeze
       Syntax:

          domfsfreeze domain [[--mountpoint] mountpoint...]

       Freeze mounted filesystems within a running domain to prepare for
       consistent snapshots.

       The --mountpoint option takes a parameter mountpoint, which is a mount
       point path of the filesystem to be frozen. This option can occur multiple
       times. If this is not specified, every mounted filesystem is frozen.

       Note: snapshot-create command has a --quiesce option to freeze and thaw
       the filesystems automatically to keep snapshots consistent.  domfsfreeze
       command is only needed when a user wants to utilize the native snapshot
       features of storage devices not supported by libvirt.

   domfsinfo
       Syntax:

          domfsinfo domain

       Show a list of mounted filesystems within the running domain. The list
       contains mountpoints, names of a mounted device in the guest, filesystem
       types, and unique target names used in the domain XML (<target
       dev='name'/>).

       Note that this command requires a guest agent configured and running in
       the domain's guest OS.

   domfsthaw
       Syntax:

          domfsthaw domain [[--mountpoint] mountpoint...]

       Thaw mounted filesystems within a running domain, which have been frozen
       by domfsfreeze command.

       The --mountpoint option takes a parameter mountpoint, which is a mount
       point path of the filesystem to be thawed. This option can occur multiple
       times. If this is not specified, every mounted filesystem is thawed.

   domfstrim
       Syntax:

          domfstrim domain [--minimum bytes] [--mountpoint mountPoint]

       Issue a fstrim command on all mounted filesystems within a running
       domain. It discards blocks which are not in use by the filesystem.  If
       --minimum bytes is specified, it tells guest kernel length of contiguous
       free range. Smaller than this may be ignored (this is a hint and the
       guest may not respect it). By increasing this value, the fstrim operation
       will complete more quickly for filesystems with badly fragmented free
       space, although not all blocks will be discarded.  The default value is
       zero, meaning "discard every free block". Moreover, if a user wants to
       trim only one mount point, it can be specified via optional --mountpoint
       parameter.

   domhostname
       Syntax:

          domhostname domain [--source lease|agent]

       Returns the hostname of a domain, if the hypervisor makes it available.

       The --source argument specifies what data source to use for the
       hostnames, currently 'lease' to read DHCP leases or 'agent' to query the
       guest OS via an agent. If unspecified, driver returns the default method
       available (some drivers support only one type of source).

   domid
       Syntax:

          domid domain-name-or-uuid

       Convert a domain name (or UUID) to a domain id

   domif-getlink
       Syntax:

          domif-getlink domain interface-device [--config]

       Query link state of the domain's virtual interface. If --config is
       specified, query the persistent configuration, for compatibility
       purposes, --persistent is alias of --config.

       interface-device can be the interface's target name or the MAC address.

   domif-setlink
       Syntax:

          domif-setlink domain interface-device state [--config]

       Modify link state of the domain's virtual interface. Possible values for
       state are "up" and "down". If --config is specified, only the persistent
       configuration of the domain is modified, for compatibility purposes,
       --persistent is alias of --config.  interface-device can be the
       interface's target name or the MAC address.

   domifaddr
       Syntax:

          domifaddr domain [interface] [--full]
             [--source lease|agent|arp]

       Get a list of interfaces of a running domain along with their IP and MAC
       addresses, or limited output just for one interface if interface is
       specified. Note that interface can be driver dependent, it can be the
       name within guest OS or the name you would see in domain XML. Moreover,
       the whole command may require a guest agent to be configured for the
       queried domain under some hypervisors, notably QEMU.

       If --full is specified, the interface name and MAC address is always
       displayed when the interface has multiple IP addresses or aliases;
       otherwise, only the interface name and MAC address is displayed for the
       first name and MAC address with "-" for the others using the same name
       and MAC address.

       The --source argument specifies what data source to use for the
       addresses, currently 'lease' to read DHCP leases, 'agent' to query the
       guest OS via an agent, or 'arp' to get IP from host's arp tables.  If
       unspecified, 'lease' is the default.

   backup-begin
       Syntax:

          backup-begin domain [backupxml] [checkpointxml] [--reuse-external]

       Begin a new backup job. If backupxml is omitted, this defaults to a full
       backup using a push model to filenames generated by libvirt; supplying
       XML allows fine-tuning such as requesting an incremental backup relative
       to an earlier checkpoint, controlling which disks participate or which
       filenames are involved, or requesting the use of a pull model backup.
       The backup-dumpxml command shows any resulting values assigned by
       libvirt. For more information on backup XML, see:
       https://libvirt.org/formatbackup.html

       If --reuse-external is used it instructs libvirt to reuse temporary and
       output files provided by the user in backupxml.

       If checkpointxml is specified, a second file with a top-level element of
       domaincheckpoint is used to create a simultaneous checkpoint, for doing a
       later incremental backup relative to the time the backup was created. See
       checkpoint-create for more details on checkpoints.

       This command returns as soon as possible, and the backup job runs in the
       background; the progress of a push model backup can be checked with
       domjobinfo or by waiting for an event with event (the progress of a pull
       model backup is under the control of whatever third party connects to the
       NBD export). The job is ended with domjobabort.

   backup-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          backup-dumpxml domain

       Output XML describing the current backup job.

   domiflist
       Syntax:

          domiflist domain [--inactive]

       Print a table showing the brief information of all virtual interfaces
       associated with domain. If --inactive is specified, query the virtual
       interfaces that will be used on the next boot, rather than those
       currently in use by a running domain. Other contexts that require a MAC
       address of virtual interface (such as detach-interface or domif-setlink)
       will accept the MAC address printed by this command.

   domifstat
       Syntax:

          domifstat domain interface-device

       Get network interface stats for a running domain. The network interface
       stats are only available for interfaces that have a physical source
       interface. This does not include, for example, a 'user' interface type
       since it is a virtual LAN with NAT to the outside world. interface-device
       can be the interface target by name or MAC address.

   domiftune
       Syntax:

          domiftune domain interface-device [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]
             [*--inbound average,peak,burst,floor*]
             [*--outbound average,peak,burst*]

       Set or query the domain's network interface's bandwidth parameters.
       interface-device can be the interface's target name (<target
       dev='name'/>), or the MAC address.

       If no --inbound or --outbound is specified, this command will query and
       show the bandwidth settings. Otherwise, it will set the inbound or
       outbound bandwidth. average,peak,burst,floor is the same as in command
       attach-interface.  Values for average, peak and floor are expressed in
       kilobytes per second, while burst is expressed in kilobytes in a single
       burst at peak speed as described in the Network XML documentation at
       https://libvirt.org/formatnetwork.html#elementQoS.

       To clear inbound or outbound settings, use --inbound or --outbound
       respectfully with average value of zero.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If --current is
       specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. If no flag is specified, behavior is
       different depending on hypervisor.

   dominfo
       Syntax:

          dominfo domain

       Returns basic information about the domain.

   domjobabort
       Syntax:

          domjobabort domain

       Abort the currently running domain job.

   domjobinfo
       Syntax:

          domjobinfo domain [--completed [--keep-completed]] [--anystats] [--rawstats]

       Returns information about jobs running on a domain. --completed tells
       virsh to return information about a recently finished job. Statistics of
       a completed job are automatically destroyed once read (unless
       --keep-completed is used) or when libvirtd is restarted.

       Normally only statistics for running and successful completed jobs are
       printed.  --anystats can be used to also display statistics for failed
       jobs.

       In case --rawstats is used, all fields are printed as received from the
       server without any attempts to interpret the data. The "Job type:" field
       is special, since it's reported by the API and not part of stats.

       Note that time information returned for completed migrations may be
       completely irrelevant unless both source and destination hosts have
       synchronized time (i.e., NTP daemon is running on both of them).

   dommemstat
       Syntax:

          dommemstat domain [--period seconds] [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Get memory stats for a running domain.

       Availability of these fields depends on hypervisor. Unsupported fields
       are missing from the output. Other fields may appear if communicating
       with a newer version of libvirtd.

       Explanation of fields:

       • swap_in           - The amount of data read from swap space (in KiB)

       • swap_out          - The amount of memory written out to swap space (in
         KiB)

       • major_fault       - The number of page faults where disk IO was
         required

       • minor_fault       - The number of other page faults

       • unused            - The amount of memory left unused by the system (in
         KiB)

       • available         - The amount of usable memory as seen by the domain
         (in KiB)

       • actual            - Current balloon value (in KiB)

       • rss               - Resident Set Size of the running domain's process
         (in KiB)

       • usable            - The amount of memory which can be reclaimed by
         balloon without causing host swapping (in KiB)

       • last-update       - Timestamp of the last update of statistics (in
         seconds)

       • disk_caches       - The amount of memory that can be reclaimed without
         additional I/O, typically disk caches (in KiB)

       • hugetlb_pgalloc   - The number of successful huge page allocations
         initiated from within the domain

       • hugetlb_pgfail    - The number of failed huge page allocations
         initiated from within the domain

       For QEMU/KVM with a memory balloon, setting the optional --period to a
       value larger than 0 in seconds will allow the balloon driver to return
       additional statistics which will be displayed by subsequent dommemstat
       commands. Setting the --period to 0 will stop the balloon driver
       collection, but does not clear the statistics in the balloon driver.
       Requires at least QEMU/KVM 1.5 to be running on the host.

       The --live, --config, and --current flags are only valid when using the
       --period option in order to set the collection period for the balloon
       driver. If --live is specified, only the running guest collection period
       is affected. If --config is specified, affect the next start of a
       persistent guest. If --current is specified, it is equivalent to either
       --live or --config, depending on the current state of the guest.

       Both --live and --config flags may be given, but --current is exclusive.
       If no flag is specified, behavior is different depending on the guest
       state.

   domname
       Syntax:

          domname domain-id-or-uuid

       Convert a domain Id (or UUID) to domain name

   dompmsuspend
       Syntax:

          dompmsuspend domain target [--duration]

       Suspend a running domain into one of these states (possible target
       values):

       • mem - equivalent of S3 ACPI state

       • disk - equivalent of S4 ACPI state

       • hybrid - RAM is saved to disk but not powered off

       The --duration argument specifies number of seconds before the domain is
       woken up after it was suspended (see also dompmwakeup). Default is 0 for
       unlimited suspend time. (This feature isn't currently supported by any
       hypervisor driver and 0 should be used.).

       Note that this command requires a guest agent configured and running in
       the domain's guest OS.

       Beware that at least for QEMU, the domain's process will be terminated
       when target disk is used and a new process will be launched when libvirt
       is asked to wake up the domain. As a result of this, any runtime changes,
       such as device hotplug or memory settings, are lost unless such changes
       were made with --config flag.

   dompmwakeup
       Syntax:

          dompmwakeup domain

       Wakeup a domain from pmsuspended state (either suspended by dompmsuspend
       or from the guest itself). Injects a wakeup into the guest that is in
       pmsuspended state, rather than waiting for the previously requested
       duration (if any) to elapse. This operation does not necessarily fail if
       the domain is running.

   domrename
       Syntax:

          domrename domain new-name

       Rename a domain. This command changes current domain name to the new name
       specified in the second argument.

       Note: Domain must be inactive.

   domstate
       Syntax:

          domstate domain [--reason]

       Returns state about a domain.  --reason tells virsh to also print reason
       for the state.

   domstats
       Syntax:

          domstats [--raw] [--enforce] [--backing] [--nowait] [--state]
             [--cpu-total] [--balloon] [--vcpu] [--interface]
             [--block] [--perf] [--iothread] [--memory] [--dirtyrate]
             [[--list-active] [--list-inactive]
              [--list-persistent] [--list-transient] [--list-running]y
              [--list-paused] [--list-shutoff] [--list-other]] | [domain ...]

       Get statistics for multiple or all domains. Without any argument this
       command prints all available statistics for all domains.

       The list of domains to gather stats for can be either limited by listing
       the domains as a space separated list, or by specifying one of the
       filtering flags --list-NNN. (The approaches can't be combined.)

       By default some of the returned fields may be converted to more human
       friendly values by a set of pretty-printers. To suppress this behavior
       use the --raw flag.

       The individual statistics groups are selectable via specific flags. By
       default all supported statistics groups are returned. Supported
       statistics groups flags are: --state, --cpu-total, --balloon, --vcpu,
       --interface, --block, --perf, --iothread, --memory, --dirtyrate.

       Note that - depending on the hypervisor type and version or the domain
       state - not all of the following statistics may be returned.

       When selecting the --state group the following fields are returned:

       • state.state - state of the VM, returned as number from virDomainState
         enum

       • state.reason - reason for entering given state, returned as int from
         virDomain*Reason enum corresponding to given state

       --cpu-total returns:

       • cpu.time - total cpu time spent for this domain in nanoseconds

       • cpu.user - user cpu time spent in nanoseconds

       • cpu.system - system cpu time spent in nanoseconds

       • cpu.haltpoll.success.time - cpu halt polling success time spent in
         nanoseconds

       • cpu.haltpoll.fail.time - cpu halt polling fail time spent in
         nanoseconds

       • cpu.cache.monitor.count - the number of cache monitors for this domain

       • cpu.cache.monitor.<num>.name - the name of cache monitor <num>

       • cpu.cache.monitor.<num>.vcpus - vcpu list of cache monitor <num>

       • cpu.cache.monitor.<num>.bank.count - the number of cache banks in cache
         monitor <num>

       • cpu.cache.monitor.<num>.bank.<index>.id - host allocated cache id for
         bank <index> in cache monitor <num>

       • cpu.cache.monitor.<num>.bank.<index>.bytes - the number of bytes of
         last level cache that the domain is using on cache bank <index>

       --balloon returns:

       • balloon.current - the memory in KiB currently used

       • balloon.maximum - the maximum memory in KiB allowed

       • balloon.swap_in - the amount of data read from swap space (in KiB)

       • balloon.swap_out - the amount of memory written out to swap space (in
         KiB)

       • balloon.major_fault - the number of page faults when disk IO was
         required

       • balloon.minor_fault - the number of other page faults

       • balloon.unused - the amount of memory left unused by the system (in
         KiB)

       • balloon.available - the amount of usable memory as seen by the domain
         (in KiB)

       • balloon.rss - Resident Set Size of running domain's process (in KiB)

       • balloon.usable - the amount of memory which can be reclaimed by balloon
         without causing host swapping (in KiB)

       • balloon.last-update - timestamp of the last update of statistics (in
         seconds)

       • balloon.disk_caches - the amount of memory that can be reclaimed
         without additional I/O, typically disk (in KiB)

       • balloon.hugetlb_pgalloc - the number of successful huge page
         allocations from inside the domain via virtio balloon

       • balloon.hugetlb_pgfail - the number of failed huge page allocations
         from inside the domain via virtio balloon

       --vcpu returns:

       • vcpu.current - current number of online virtual CPUs

       • vcpu.maximum - maximum number of online virtual CPUs

       • vcpu.<num>.state - state of the virtual CPU <num>, as number from
         virVcpuState enum

       • vcpu.<num>.time - virtual cpu time spent by virtual CPU <num> (in
         microseconds)

       • vcpu.<num>.wait - virtual cpu time spent by virtual CPU <num> waiting
         on I/O (in microseconds)

       • vcpu.<num>.halted - virtual CPU <num> is halted: yes or no (may
         indicate the processor is idle or even disabled, depending on the
         architecture)

       • vcpu.<num>.delay - time the vCPU <num> thread was enqueued by the host
         scheduler, but was waiting in the queue instead of running.  Exposed to
         the VM as a steal time.

       --interface returns:

       • net.count - number of network interfaces on this domain

       • net.<num>.name - name of the interface <num>

       • net.<num>.rx.bytes - number of bytes received

       • net.<num>.rx.pkts - number of packets received

       • net.<num>.rx.errs - number of receive errors

       • net.<num>.rx.drop - number of receive packets dropped

       • net.<num>.tx.bytes - number of bytes transmitted

       • net.<num>.tx.pkts - number of packets transmitted

       • net.<num>.tx.errs - number of transmission errors

       • net.<num>.tx.drop - number of transmit packets dropped

       --perf returns the statistics of all enabled perf events:

       • perf.cmt - the cache usage in Byte currently used

       • perf.mbmt - total system bandwidth from one level of cache

       • perf.mbml - bandwidth of memory traffic for a memory controller

       • perf.cpu_cycles - the count of cpu cycles (total/elapsed)

       • perf.instructions - the count of instructions

       • perf.cache_references - the count of cache hits

       • perf.cache_misses - the count of caches misses

       • perf.branch_instructions - the count of branch instructions

       • perf.branch_misses - the count of branch misses

       • perf.bus_cycles - the count of bus cycles

       • perf.stalled_cycles_frontend - the count of stalled frontend cpu cycles

       • perf.stalled_cycles_backend - the count of stalled backend cpu cycles

       • perf.ref_cpu_cycles - the count of ref cpu cycles

       • perf.cpu_clock - the count of cpu clock time

       • perf.task_clock - the count of task clock time

       • perf.page_faults - the count of page faults

       • perf.context_switches - the count of context switches

       • perf.cpu_migrations - the count of cpu migrations

       • perf.page_faults_min - the count of minor page faults

       • perf.page_faults_maj - the count of major page faults

       • perf.alignment_faults - the count of alignment faults

       • perf.emulation_faults - the count of emulation faults

       See the perf command for more details about each event.

       --block returns information about disks associated with each domain.
       Using the --backing flag extends this information to cover all resources
       in the backing chain, rather than the default of limiting information to
       the active layer for each guest disk.  Information listed includes:

       • block.count - number of block devices being listed

       • block.<num>.name - name of the target of the block device <num> (the
         same name for multiple entries if --backing is present)

       • block.<num>.backingIndex - when --backing is present, matches up with
         the <backingStore> index listed in domain XML for backing files

       • block.<num>.path - file source of block device <num>, if it is a local
         file or block device

       • block.<num>.rd.reqs - number of read requests

       • block.<num>.rd.bytes - number of read bytes

       • block.<num>.rd.times - total time (ns) spent on reads

       • block.<num>.wr.reqs - number of write requests

       • block.<num>.wr.bytes - number of written bytes

       • block.<num>.wr.times - total time (ns) spent on writes

       • block.<num>.fl.reqs - total flush requests

       • block.<num>.fl.times - total time (ns) spent on cache flushing

       • block.<num>.errors - Xen only: the 'oo_req' value

       • block.<num>.allocation - offset of highest written sector in bytes

       • block.<num>.capacity - logical size of source file in bytes

       • block.<num>.physical - physical size of source file in bytes

       • block.<num>.threshold - threshold (in bytes) for delivering the
         VIR_DOMAIN_EVENT_ID_BLOCK_THRESHOLD event. See domblkthreshold.

       --iothread returns information about IOThreads on the running guest if
       supported by the hypervisor.

       The "poll-max-ns" for each thread is the maximum nanoseconds to allow
       each polling interval to occur. A polling interval is a period of time
       allowed for a thread to process data before being the guest gives up its
       CPU quantum back to the host. A value set too small will not allow the
       IOThread to run long enough on a CPU to process data. A value set too
       high will consume too much CPU time per IOThread failing to allow other
       threads running on the CPU to get time. The polling interval is not
       available for statistical purposes.

       •

         iothread.count - maximum number of IOThreads in the subsequent list
                as unsigned int. Each IOThread in the list will will use it's
                iothread_id value as the <id>. There may be fewer <id> entries
                than the iothread.count value if the polling values are not
                supported.

       • iothread.<id>.poll-max-ns - maximum polling time in nanoseconds used by
         the <id> IOThread. A value of 0 (zero) indicates polling is disabled.

       • iothread.<id>.poll-grow - polling time grow value. A value of 0 (zero)
         growth is managed by the hypervisor.

       • iothread.<id>.poll-shrink - polling time shrink value. A value of
         (zero) indicates shrink is managed by hypervisor.

       --memory returns:

       • memory.bandwidth.monitor.count - the number of memory bandwidth
         monitors for this domain

       • memory.bandwidth.monitor.<num>.name  - the name of monitor <num>

       • memory.bandwidth.monitor.<num>.vcpus - the vcpu list of monitor <num>

       •

         memory.bandwidth.monitor.<num>.node.count - the number of memory
                controller in monitor <num>

       • memory.bandwidth.monitor.<num>.node.<index>.id - host allocated memory
         controller id for controller <index> of monitor <num>

       • memory.bandwidth.monitor.<num>.node.<index>.bytes.local - the
         accumulative bytes consumed by @vcpus that passing through the memory
         controller in the same processor that the scheduled host CPU belongs
         to.

       • memory.bandwidth.monitor.<num>.node.<index>.bytes.total - the total
         bytes consumed by @vcpus that passing through all memory controllers,
         either local or remote controller.

       --dirtyrate returns:

       • dirtyrate.calc_status - the status of last memory dirty rate
         calculation, returned as number from virDomainDirtyRateStatus enum.

       • dirtyrate.calc_start_time - the start time of last memory dirty rate
         calculation.

       • dirtyrate.calc_period - the period of last memory dirty rate
         calculation.

       • dirtyrate.megabytes_per_second - the calculated memory dirty rate in
         MiB/s.

       Selecting a specific statistics groups doesn't guarantee that the daemon
       supports the selected group of stats. Flag --enforce forces the command
       to fail if the daemon doesn't support the selected group.

       When collecting stats libvirtd may wait for some time if there's already
       another job running on given domain for it to finish.  This may cause
       unnecessary delay in delivering stats. Using --nowait suppresses this
       behaviour. On the other hand some statistics might be missing for such
       domain.

   domtime
       Syntax:

          domtime domain { [--now] [--pretty] [--sync] [--time time] }

       Gets or sets the domain's system time. When run without any arguments
       (but domain), the current domain's system time is printed out. The
       --pretty modifier can be used to print the time in more human readable
       form.

       When --time time is specified, the domain's time is not gotten but set
       instead. The --now modifier acts like if it was an alias for --time $now,
       which means it sets the time that is currently on the host virsh is
       running at. In both cases (setting and getting), time is in seconds
       relative to Epoch of 1970-01-01 in UTC.  The --sync modifies the set
       behavior a bit: The time passed is ignored, but the time to set is read
       from domain's RTC instead. Please note, that some hypervisors may require
       a guest agent to be configured in order to get or set the guest time.

   domuuid
       Syntax:

          domuuid domain-name-or-id

       Convert a domain name or id to domain UUID

   domxml-from-native
       Syntax:

          domxml-from-native format config

       Convert the file config in the native guest configuration format named by
       format to a domain XML format. For QEMU/KVM hypervisor, the format
       argument must be qemu-argv. For Xen hypervisor, the format argument may
       be xen-xm, xen-xl, or xen-sxpr. For LXC hypervisor, the format argument
       must be lxc-tools. For VMware/ESX hypervisor, the format argument must be
       vmware-vmx.  For the Bhyve hypervisor, the format argument must be
       bhyve-argv.

   domxml-to-native
       Syntax:

          domxml-to-native format { [--xml] xml | --domain domain-name-or-id-or-uuid }

       Convert the file xml into domain XML format or convert an existing
       --domain to the native guest configuration format named by format.  The
       xml and --domain arguments are mutually exclusive. For the types of
       format argument, refer to domxml-from-native.

   dump
       Syntax:

          dump domain corefilepath [--bypass-cache]
             { [--live] | [--crash] | [--reset] }
             [--verbose] [--memory-only] [--format string]

       Dumps the core of a domain to a file for analysis.  If --live is
       specified, the domain continues to run until the core dump is complete,
       rather than pausing up front.  If --crash is specified, the domain is
       halted with a crashed status, rather than merely left in a paused state.
       If --reset is specified, the domain is reset after successful dump.
       Note, these three switches are mutually exclusive.  If --bypass-cache is
       specified, the save will avoid the file system cache, although this may
       slow down the operation.  If --memory-only is specified, the file is elf
       file, and will only include domain's memory and cpu common register
       value. It is very useful if the domain uses host devices directly.
       --format string is used to specify the format of 'memory-only' dump, and
       string can be one of: elf, kdump-zlib(kdump-compressed format with
       zlib-compressed), kdump-lzo(kdump-compressed format with lzo-compressed),
       kdump-snappy(kdump-compressed format with snappy-compressed),
       win-dmp(Windows full crashdump format).

       The progress may be monitored using domjobinfo virsh command and canceled
       with domjobabort command (sent by another virsh instance). Another option
       is to send SIGINT (usually with Ctrl-C) to the virsh process running dump
       command. --verbose displays the progress of dump.

       NOTE: Some hypervisors may require the user to manually ensure proper
       permissions on file and path specified by argument corefilepath.

       NOTE: Crash dump in a old kvmdump format is being obsolete and cannot be
       loaded and processed by crash utility since its version 6.1.0. A
       --memory-only option is required in order to produce valid ELF file which
       can be later processed by the crash utility.

   dumpxml
       Syntax:

          dumpxml domain [--inactive] [--security-info] [--update-cpu] [--migratable]

       Output the domain information as an XML dump to stdout, this format can
       be used by the create command. Additional options affecting the XML dump
       may be used. --inactive tells virsh to dump domain configuration that
       will be used on next start of the domain as opposed to the current domain
       configuration.  Using --security-info will also include security
       sensitive information in the XML dump. --update-cpu updates domain CPU
       requirements according to host CPU. With --migratable one can request an
       XML that is suitable for migrations, i.e., compatible with older libvirt
       releases and possibly amended with internal run-time options. This option
       may automatically enable other options (--update-cpu, --security-info,
       ...) as necessary.

   edit
       Syntax:

          edit domain

       Edit the XML configuration file for a domain, which will affect the next
       boot of the guest.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh dumpxml --inactive --security-info domain > domain.xml
          vi domain.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh define domain.xml

       except that it does some error checking.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

   emulatorpin
       Syntax:

          emulatorpin domain [cpulist] [[--live] [--config]  | [--current]]

       Query or change the pinning of domain's emulator threads to host physical
       CPUs.

       See vcpupin for cpulist.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If --current is
       specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given if cpulist is present, but --current is exclusive.  If no flag is
       specified, behavior is different depending on hypervisor.

   event
       Syntax:

          event {[domain] { event | --all } [--loop] [--timeout seconds] [--timestamp] | --list}

       Wait for a class of domain events to occur, and print appropriate details
       of events as they happen.  The events can optionally be filtered by
       domain.  Using --list as the only argument will provide a list of
       possible event values known by this client, although the connection might
       not allow registering for all these events.  It is also possible to use
       --all instead of event to register for all possible event types at once.

       By default, this command is one-shot, and returns success once an event
       occurs; you can send SIGINT (usually via Ctrl-C) to quit immediately.  If
       --timeout is specified, the command gives up waiting for events after
       seconds have elapsed.   With --loop, the command prints all events until
       a timeout or interrupt key.

       When --timestamp is used, a human-readable timestamp will be printed
       before the event.

   get-user-sshkeys
       Syntax:

          get-user-sshkeys domain user

       Print SSH authorized keys for given user in the guest domain. Please
       note, that an entry in the file has internal structure as defined by
       sshd(8) and virsh/libvirt does handle keys as opaque strings, i.e. does
       not interpret them.

   guest-agent-timeout
       Syntax:

          guest-agent-timeout domain [--timeout value]

       Set how long to wait for a response from guest agent commands. By
       default, agent commands block forever waiting for a response. value must
       be a positive value (wait for given amount of seconds) or one of the
       following values:

       • -2 - block forever waiting for a result (used when --timeout is
         omitted),

       • -1 - reset timeout to the default value (currently defined as 5 seconds
         in libvirt daemon),

       • 0 - do not wait at all,

   guestinfo
       Syntax:

          guestinfo domain [--user] [--os] [--timezone] [--hostname] [--filesystem]
             [--disk]

       Print information about the guest from the point of view of the guest
       agent.  Note that this command requires a guest agent to be configured
       and running in the domain's guest OS.

       When run without any arguments, this command prints all information types
       that are supported by the guest agent. You can limit the types of
       information that are returned by specifying one or more flags.  If a
       requested information type is not supported, the processes will provide
       an exit code of 1.  Available information types flags are --user, --os,
       --timezone, --hostname, --filesystem and --disk.

       Note that depending on the hypervisor type and the version of the guest
       agent running within the domain, not all of the following information may
       be returned.

       When selecting the --user information type, the following fields may be
       returned:

       • user.count - the number of active users on this domain

       • user.<num>.name - username of user <num>

       • user.<num>.domain - domain of the user <num> (may only be present on
         certain guets types)

       • user.<num>.login-time - the login time of user <num> in milliseconds
         since the epoch

       --os returns:

       • os.id - a string identifying the operating system

       • os.name - the name of the operating system

       • os.pretty-name - a pretty name for the operating system

       • os.version - the version of the operating system

       • os.version-id - the version id of the operating system

       • os.kernel-release - the release of the operating system kernel

       • os.kernel-version - the version of the operating system kernel

       • os.machine - the machine hardware name

       • os.variant - a specific variant or edition of the operating system

       • os.variant-id - the id for a specific variant or edition of the
         operating system

       --timezone returns:

       • timezone.name - the name of the timezone

       • timezone.offset - the offset to UTC in seconds

       --hostname returns:

       • hostname - the hostname of the domain

       --filesystem returns:

       • fs.count - the number of filesystems defined on this domain

       • fs.<num>.mountpoint - the path to the mount point for filesystem <num>

       • fs.<num>.name - device name in the guest (e.g. sda1) for filesystem
         <num>

       • fs.<num>.fstype - the type of filesystem <num>

       • fs.<num>.total-bytes - the total size of filesystem <num>

       • fs.<num>.used-bytes - the number of bytes used in filesystem <num>

       • fs.<num>.disk.count - the number of disks targeted by filesystem <num>

       • fs.<num>.disk.<num>.alias - the device alias of disk <num> (e.g. sda)

       • fs.<num>.disk.<num>.serial - the serial number of disk <num>

       • fs.<num>.disk.<num>.device - the device node of disk <num>

       --disk returns:

       • disk.count - the number of disks defined on this domain

       • disk.<num>.name - device node (Linux) or device UNC (Windows)

       • disk.<num>.partition - whether this is a partition or disk

       • disk.<num>.dependency.count - the number of device dependencies

       • disk.<num>.dependency.<num>.name - a dependency name

       • disk.<num>.serial -  optional disk serial number

       • disk.<num>.alias - the device alias of the disk (e.g. sda)

       • disk.<num>.guest_alias - optional alias assigned to the disk

   guestvcpus
       Syntax:

          guestvcpus domain [[--enable] | [--disable]] [cpulist]

       Query or change state of vCPUs from guest's point of view using the guest
       agent.  When invoked without cpulist the guest is queried for available
       guest vCPUs, their state and possibility to be offlined.

       If cpulist is provided then one of --enable or --disable must be provided
       too. The desired operation is then executed on the domain.

       See vcpupin for information on cpulist.

   iothreadadd
       Syntax:

          iothreadadd domain iothread_id [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Add a new IOThread to the domain using the specified iothread_id.  If the
       iothread_id already exists, the command will fail. The iothread_id must
       be greater than zero.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest. If the guest is not
       running an error is returned.  If --config is specified, affect the next
       start of a persistent guest.  If --current is specified, it is equivalent
       to either --live or --config, depending on the current state of the
       guest.

   iothreaddel
       Syntax:

          iothreaddel domain iothread_id [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Delete an IOThread from the domain using the specified iothread_id.  If
       an IOThread is currently assigned to a disk resource such as via the
       attach-disk command, then the attempt to remove the IOThread will fail.
       If the iothread_id does not exist an error will occur.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest. If the guest is not
       running an error is returned.  If --config is specified, affect the next
       start of a persistent guest.  If --current is specified, it is equivalent
       to either --live or --config, depending on the current state of the
       guest.

   iothreadinfo
       Syntax:

          iothreadinfo domain [[--live] [--config] | [--current]]

       Display basic domain IOThreads information including the IOThread ID and
       the CPU Affinity for each IOThread.

       If --live is specified, get the IOThreads data from the running guest. If
       the guest is not running, an error is returned.  If --config is
       specified, get the IOThreads data from the next start of a persistent
       guest.  If --current is specified or --live and --config are not
       specified, then get the IOThread data based on the current guest state,
       which can either be live or offline.

   iothreadpin
       Syntax:

          iothreadpin domain iothread cpulist [[--live] [--config] | [--current]]

       Change the pinning of a domain IOThread to host physical CPUs. In order
       to retrieve a list of all IOThreads, use iothreadinfo. To pin an iothread
       specify the cpulist desired for the IOThread ID as listed in the
       iothreadinfo output.

       cpulist is a list of physical CPU numbers. Its syntax is a comma
       separated list and a special markup using '-' and '^' (ex. '0-4',
       '0-3,^2') can also be allowed. The '-' denotes the range and the '^'
       denotes exclusive.  If you want to reset iothreadpin setting, that is, to
       pin an iothread to all physical cpus, simply specify 'r' as a cpulist.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest. If the guest is not
       running, an error is returned.  If --config is specified, affect the next
       start of a persistent guest.  If --current is specified, it is equivalent
       to either --live or --config, depending on the current state of the
       guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be given if cpulist is
       present, but --current is exclusive.  If no flag is specified, behavior
       is different depending on hypervisor.

       Note: The expression is sequentially evaluated, so "0-15,^8" is identical
       to "9-14,0-7,15" but not identical to "^8,0-15".

   iothreadset
       Syntax:

          iothreadset domain iothread_id [[--poll-max-ns ns] [--poll-grow factor]
             [--poll-shrink divisor]]
             [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Modifies an existing iothread of the domain using the specified
       iothread_id. The --poll-max-ns provides the maximum polling interval to
       be allowed for an IOThread in ns. If a 0 (zero) is provided, then polling
       for the IOThread is disabled.  The --poll-grow is the factor by which the
       current polling time will be adjusted in order to reach the maximum
       polling time. If a 0 (zero) is provided, then the default factor will be
       used. The --poll-shrink is the quotient by which the current polling time
       will be reduced in order to get below the maximum polling interval. If a
       0 (zero) is provided, then the default quotient will be used. The polling
       values are purely dynamic for a running guest. Saving, destroying,
       stopping, etc. the guest will result in the polling values returning to
       hypervisor defaults at the next start, restore, etc.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest. If the guest is not
       running an error is returned.  If --current is specified or --live is not
       specified, then handle as if --live was specified.  (Where "current" here
       means whatever the present guest state is: live or offline.)

   managedsave
       Syntax:

          managedsave domain [--bypass-cache] [{--running | --paused}] [--verbose]

       Save and destroy (stop) a running domain, so it can be restarted from the
       same state at a later time.  When the virsh start command is next run for
       the domain, it will automatically be started from this saved state.  If
       --bypass-cache is specified, the save will avoid the file system cache,
       although this may slow down the operation.

       The progress may be monitored using domjobinfo virsh command and canceled
       with domjobabort command (sent by another virsh instance). Another option
       is to send SIGINT (usually with Ctrl-C) to the virsh process running
       managedsave command. --verbose displays the progress of save.

       Normally, starting a managed save will decide between running or paused
       based on the state the domain was in when the save was done; passing
       either the --running or --paused flag will allow overriding which state
       the start should use.

       The dominfo command can be used to query whether a domain currently has
       any managed save image.

   managedsave-define
       Syntax:

          managedsave-define domain xml [{--running | --paused}]

       Update the domain XML that will be used when domain is later started. The
       xml argument must be a file name containing the alternative XML, with
       changes only in the host-specific portions of the domain XML. For
       example, it can be used to change disk file paths.

       The managed save image records whether the domain should be started to a
       running or paused state.  Normally, this command does not alter the
       recorded state; passing either the --running or --paused flag will allow
       overriding which state the start should use.

   managedsave-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          managedsave-dumpxml domain [--security-info]

       Extract the domain XML that was in effect at the time the saved state
       file file was created with the managedsave command.  Using
       --security-info will also include security sensitive information.

   managedsave-edit
       Syntax:

          managedsave-edit domain [{--running | --paused}]

       Edit the XML configuration associated with a saved state file of a domain
       was created by the managedsave command.

       The managed save image records whether the domain should be started to a
       running or paused state.  Normally, this command does not alter the
       recorded state; passing either the --running or --paused flag will allow
       overriding which state the restore should use.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh managedsave-dumpxml domain-name > state-file.xml
          vi state-file.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh managedsave-define domain-name state-file-xml

       except that it does some error checking.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

   managedsave-remove
       Syntax:

          managedsave-remove domain

       Remove the managedsave state file for a domain, if it exists.  This
       ensures the domain will do a full boot the next time it is started.

   maxvcpus
       Syntax:

          maxvcpus [type]

       Provide the maximum number of virtual CPUs supported for a guest VM on
       this connection.  If provided, the type parameter must be a valid type
       attribute for the <domain> element of XML.

   memtune
       Syntax:

          memtune domain [--hard-limit size] [--soft-limit size] [--swap-hard-limit size]
             [--min-guarantee size] [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Allows you to display or set the domain memory parameters. Without flags,
       the current settings are displayed; with a flag, the appropriate limit is
       adjusted if supported by the hypervisor.  LXC and QEMU/KVM support
       --hard-limit, --soft-limit, and --swap-hard-limit.  --min-guarantee is
       supported only by ESX hypervisor.  Each of these limits are scaled
       integers (see NOTES above), with a default of kibibytes (blocks of 1024
       bytes) if no suffix is present. Libvirt rounds up to the nearest
       kibibyte.  Some hypervisors require a larger granularity than KiB, and
       requests that are not an even multiple will be rounded up.  For example,
       vSphere/ESX rounds the parameter up to mebibytes (1024 kibibytes).

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If --current is
       specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. If no flag is specified, behavior is
       different depending on hypervisor.

       For QEMU/KVM, the parameters are applied to the QEMU process as a whole.
       Thus, when counting them, one needs to add up guest RAM, guest video RAM,
       and some memory overhead of QEMU itself.  The last piece is hard to
       determine so one needs guess and try.

       For LXC, the displayed hard_limit value is the current memory setting
       from the XML or the results from a virsh setmem command.

       • --hard-limit

         The maximum memory the guest can use.

       • --soft-limit

         The memory limit to enforce during memory contention.

       • --swap-hard-limit

         The maximum memory plus swap the guest can use.  This has to be more
         than hard-limit value provided.

       • --min-guarantee

         The guaranteed minimum memory allocation for the guest.

       Specifying -1 as a value for these limits is interpreted as unlimited.

   metadata
       Syntax:

          metadata domain [[--live] [--config] | [--current]]
             [--edit] [uri] [key] [set] [--remove]

       Show or modify custom XML metadata of a domain. The metadata is a user
       defined XML that allows storing arbitrary XML data in the domain
       definition.  Multiple separate custom metadata pieces can be stored in
       the domain XML.  The pieces are identified by a private XML namespace
       provided via the uri argument. (See also desc that works with textual
       metadata of a domain.)

       Flags --live or --config select whether this command works on live or
       persistent definitions of the domain. If both --live and --config are
       specified, the --config option takes precedence on getting the current
       description and both live configuration and config are updated while
       setting the description. --current is exclusive and implied if none of
       these was specified.

       Flag --remove specifies that the metadata element specified by the uri
       argument should be removed rather than updated.

       Flag --edit specifies that an editor with the metadata identified by the
       uri argument should be opened and the contents saved back afterwards.
       Otherwise the new contents can be provided via the set argument.

       When setting metadata via --edit or set the key argument must be
       specified and is used to prefix the custom elements to bind them to the
       private namespace.

       If neither of --edit and set are specified the XML metadata corresponding
       to the uri namespace is displayed instead of being modified.

   migrate
       Syntax:

          migrate [--live] [--offline] [--direct] [--p2p [--tunnelled]]
             [--persistent] [--undefinesource] [--suspend] [--copy-storage-all]
             [--copy-storage-inc] [--change-protection] [--unsafe] [--verbose]
             [--rdma-pin-all] [--abort-on-error] [--postcopy] [--postcopy-after-precopy]
             domain desturi [migrateuri] [graphicsuri] [listen-address] [dname]
             [--timeout seconds [--timeout-suspend | --timeout-postcopy]]
             [--xml file] [--migrate-disks disk-list] [--disks-port port]
             [--compressed] [--comp-methods method-list]
             [--comp-mt-level] [--comp-mt-threads] [--comp-mt-dthreads]
             [--comp-xbzrle-cache] [--auto-converge] [auto-converge-initial]
             [auto-converge-increment] [--persistent-xml file] [--tls]
             [--postcopy-bandwidth bandwidth]
             [--parallel [--parallel-connections connections]]
             [--bandwidth bandwidth] [--tls-destination hostname]
             [--disks-uri URI]

       Migrate domain to another host.  Add --live for live migration; <--p2p>
       for peer-2-peer migration; --direct for direct migration; or --tunnelled
       for tunnelled migration.  --offline migrates domain definition without
       starting the domain on destination and without stopping it on source
       host.  Offline migration may be used with inactive domains and it must be
       used with --persistent option.  --persistent leaves the domain persistent
       on destination host, --undefinesource undefines the domain on the source
       host, and --suspend leaves the domain paused on the destination host.
       --copy-storage-all indicates migration with non-shared storage with full
       disk copy, --copy-storage-inc indicates migration with non-shared storage
       with incremental copy (same base image shared between source and
       destination).  In both cases the disk images have to exist on destination
       host, the --copy-storage-... options only tell libvirt to transfer data
       from the images on source host to the images found at the same place on
       the destination host. By default only non-shared non-readonly images are
       transferred. Use --migrate-disks to explicitly specify a list of disk
       targets to transfer via the comma separated disk-list argument.
       --change-protection enforces that no incompatible configuration changes
       will be made to the domain while the migration is underway; this flag is
       implicitly enabled when supported by the hypervisor, but can be
       explicitly used to reject the migration if the hypervisor lacks change
       protection support.  --verbose displays the progress of migration.
       --abort-on-error cancels the migration if a soft error (for example I/O
       error) happens during the migration. --postcopy enables post-copy logic
       in migration, but does not actually start post-copy, i.e., migration is
       started in pre-copy mode.  Once migration is running, the user may switch
       to post-copy using the migrate-postcopy command sent from another virsh
       instance or use --postcopy-after-precopy along with --postcopy to let
       libvirt automatically switch to post-copy after the first pass of
       pre-copy is finished.  The maximum bandwidth consumed during the
       post-copy phase may be limited using --postcopy-bandwidth. The maximum
       bandwidth consumed during the pre-copy phase may be limited using
       --bandwidth.

       --auto-converge forces convergence during live migration. The initial
       guest CPU throttling rate can be set with auto-converge-initial. If the
       initial throttling rate is not enough to ensure convergence, the rate is
       periodically increased by auto-converge-increment.

       --rdma-pin-all can be used with RDMA migration (i.e., when migrateuri
       starts with rdma://) to tell the hypervisor to pin all domain's memory at
       once before migration starts rather than letting it pin memory pages as
       needed. For QEMU/KVM this requires hard_limit memory tuning element (in
       the domain XML) to be used and set to the maximum memory configured for
       the domain plus any memory consumed by the QEMU process itself. Beware of
       setting the memory limit too high (and thus allowing the domain to lock
       most of the host's memory). Doing so may be dangerous to both the domain
       and the host itself since the host's kernel may run out of memory.

       Note: Individual hypervisors usually do not support all possible types of
       migration. For example, QEMU does not support direct migration.

       In some cases libvirt may refuse to migrate the domain because doing so
       may lead to potential problems such as data corruption, and thus the
       migration is considered unsafe. For QEMU domain, this may happen if the
       domain uses disks without explicitly setting cache mode to "none".
       Migrating such domains is unsafe unless the disk images are stored on
       coherent clustered filesystem, such as GFS2 or GPFS. If you are sure the
       migration is safe or you just do not care, use --unsafe to force the
       migration.

       dname is used for renaming the domain to new name during migration, which
       also usually can be omitted.  Likewise, --xml file is usually omitted,
       but can be used to supply an alternative XML file for use on the
       destination to supply a larger set of changes to any host-specific
       portions of the domain XML, such as accounting for naming differences
       between source and destination in accessing underlying storage.  If
       --persistent is enabled, --persistent-xml file can be used to supply an
       alternative XML file which will be used as the persistent guest
       definition on the destination host.

       --timeout seconds tells virsh to run a specified action when live
       migration exceeds that many seconds.  It can only be used with --live.
       If --timeout-suspend is specified, the domain will be suspended after the
       timeout and the migration will complete offline; this is the default if
       no --timeout-\`` option is specified on the command line.  When
       *--timeout-postcopy is used, virsh will switch migration from pre-copy to
       post-copy upon timeout; migration has to be started with --postcopy
       option for this to work.

       --compressed activates compression, the compression method is chosen with
       --comp-methods. Supported methods are "mt" and "xbzrle" and can be used
       in any combination. When no methods are specified, a hypervisor default
       methods will be used. QEMU defaults to "xbzrle". Compression methods can
       be tuned further. --comp-mt-level sets compression level.  Values are in
       range from 0 to 9, where 1 is maximum speed and 9 is maximum compression.
       --comp-mt-threads and --comp-mt-dthreads set the number of compress
       threads on source and the number of decompress threads on target
       respectively. --comp-xbzrle-cache sets size of page cache in bytes.

       Providing --tls causes the migration to use the host configured TLS setup
       (see migrate_tls_x509_cert_dir in /etc/libvirt/qemu.conf) in order to
       perform the migration of the domain. Usage requires proper TLS setup for
       both source and target. Normally the TLS certificate from the destination
       host must match the host's name for TLS verification to succeed. When the
       certificate does not match the destination hostname and the expected
       certificate's hostname is known, --tls-destination can be used to pass
       the expected hostname when starting the migration.

       --parallel option will cause migration data to be sent over multiple
       parallel connections. The number of such connections can be set using
       --parallel-connections. Parallel connections may help with saturating the
       network link between the source and the target and thus speeding up the
       migration.

       Running migration can be canceled by interrupting virsh (usually using
       Ctrl-C) or by domjobabort command sent from another virsh instance.

       The desturi and migrateuri parameters can be used to control which
       destination the migration uses.  desturi is important for managed
       migration, but unused for direct migration; migrateuri is required for
       direct migration, but can usually be automatically determined for managed
       migration.

       Note: The desturi parameter for normal migration and peer2peer migration
       has different semantics:

       • normal migration: the desturi is an address of the target host as seen
         from the client machine.

       • peer2peer migration: the desturi is an address of the target host as
         seen from the source machine.

       In a special circumstance where you require a complete control of the
       connection and/or libvirt does not have network access to the remote side
       you can use a UNIX transport in the URI and specify a socket path in the
       query, for example with the qemu driver you could use this:

          qemu+unix:///system?socket=/path/to/socket

       When migrateuri is not specified, libvirt will automatically determine
       the hypervisor specific URI.  Some hypervisors, including QEMU, have an
       optional "migration_host" configuration parameter (useful when the host
       has multiple network interfaces).  If this is unspecified, libvirt
       determines a name by looking up the target host's configured hostname.

       There are a few scenarios where specifying migrateuri may help:

       • The configured hostname is incorrect, or DNS is broken.  If a host has
         a hostname which will not resolve to match one of its public IP
         addresses, then libvirt will generate an incorrect URI.  In this case
         migrateuri should be explicitly specified, using an IP address, or a
         correct hostname.

       • The host has multiple network interfaces.  If a host has multiple
         network interfaces, it might be desirable for the migration data stream
         to be sent over a specific interface for either security or performance
         reasons.  In this case migrateuri should be explicitly specified, using
         an IP address associated with the network to be used.

       • The firewall restricts what ports are available.  When libvirt
         generates a migration URI, it will pick a port number using hypervisor
         specific rules.  Some hypervisors only require a single port to be open
         in the firewalls, while others require a whole range of port numbers.
         In the latter case migrateuri might be specified to choose a specific
         port number outside the default range in order to comply with local
         firewall policies.

       • The desturi uses UNIX transport method.  In this advanced case libvirt
         should not guess a migrateuri and it should be specified using UNIX
         socket path URI:

          unix:///path/to/socket

       See https://libvirt.org/migration.html#uris for more details on migration
       URIs.

       Optional graphicsuri overrides connection parameters used for
       automatically reconnecting a graphical clients at the end of migration.
       If omitted, libvirt will compute the parameters based on target host IP
       address. In case the client does not have a direct access to the network
       virtualization hosts are connected to and needs to connect through a
       proxy, graphicsuri may be used to specify the address the client should
       connect to. The URI is formed as follows:

          protocol://hostname[:port]/[?parameters]

       where protocol is either "spice" or "vnc" and parameters is a list of
       protocol specific parameters separated by '&'. Currently recognized
       parameters are "tlsPort" and "tlsSubject". For example,

          spice://target.host.com:1234/?tlsPort=4567

       Optional listen-address sets the listen address that hypervisor on the
       destination side should bind to for incoming migration. Both IPv4 and
       IPv6 addresses are accepted as well as hostnames (the resolving is done
       on destination).  Some hypervisors do not support specifying the listen
       address and will return an error if this parameter is used. This
       parameter cannot be used if desturi uses UNIX transport method.

       Optional disks-port sets the port that hypervisor on destination side
       should bind to for incoming disks traffic. Currently it is supported only
       by QEMU.

       Optional disks-uri can also be specified (mutually exclusive with
       disks-port) to specify what the remote hypervisor should bind/connect to
       when migrating disks.  This can be tcp://address:port to specify a listen
       address (which overrides --migrate-uri and --listen-address for the disk
       migration) and a port or unix:///path/to/socket in case you need the disk
       migration to happen over a UNIX socket with that specified path.  In this
       case you need to make sure the same socket path is accessible to both
       source and destination hypervisors and connecting to the socket on the
       source (after hypervisor creates it on the destination) will actually
       connect to the destination. If you are using SELinux (at least on the
       source host) you need to make sure the socket on the source is accessible
       to libvirtd/QEMU for connection.  Libvirt cannot change the context of
       the existing socket because it is different from the file representation
       of the socket and the context is chosen by its creator (usually by using
       setsockcreatecon{,_raw}() functions).

   migrate-compcache
       Syntax:

          migrate-compcache domain [--size bytes]

       Sets and/or gets size of the cache (in bytes) used for compressing
       repeatedly transferred memory pages during live migration. When called
       without size, the command just prints current size of the compression
       cache. When size is specified, the hypervisor is asked to change
       compression cache to size bytes and then the current size is printed (the
       result may differ from the requested size due to rounding done by the
       hypervisor). The size option is supposed to be used while the domain is
       being live-migrated as a reaction to migration progress and increasing
       number of compression cache misses obtained from domjobinfo.

   migrate-getmaxdowntime
       Syntax:

          migrate-getmaxdowntime domain

       Get the maximum tolerable downtime for a domain which is being
       live-migrated to another host.  This is the number of milliseconds the
       guest is allowed to be down at the end of live migration.

   migrate-getspeed
       Syntax:

          migrate-getspeed domain [--postcopy]

       Get the maximum migration bandwidth (in MiB/s) for a domain. If the
       --postcopy option is specified, the command will get the maximum
       bandwidth allowed during a post-copy migration phase.

   migrate-postcopy
       Syntax:

          migrate-postcopy domain

       Switch the current migration from pre-copy to post-copy. This is only
       supported for a migration started with --postcopy option.

   migrate-setmaxdowntime
       Syntax:

          migrate-setmaxdowntime domain downtime

       Set maximum tolerable downtime for a domain which is being live-migrated
       to another host.  The downtime is a number of milliseconds the guest is
       allowed to be down at the end of live migration.

   migrate-setspeed
       Syntax:

          migrate-setspeed domain bandwidth [--postcopy]

       Set the maximum migration bandwidth (in MiB/s) for a domain which is
       being migrated to another host. bandwidth is interpreted as an unsigned
       long long value. Specifying a negative value results in an essentially
       unlimited value being provided to the hypervisor. The hypervisor can
       choose whether to reject the value or convert it to the maximum value
       allowed. If the --postcopy option is specified, the command will set the
       maximum bandwidth allowed during a post-copy migration phase.

   numatune
       Syntax:

          numatune domain [--mode mode] [--nodeset nodeset]
             [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Set or get a domain's numa parameters, corresponding to the <numatune>
       element of domain XML.  Without flags, the current settings are
       displayed.

       mode can be one of `strict', `interleave' and `preferred' or any valid
       number from the virDomainNumatuneMemMode enum in case the daemon supports
       it.  For a running domain, the mode can't be changed, and the nodeset can
       be changed only if the domain was started with a mode of `strict'.

       nodeset is a list of numa nodes used by the host for running the domain.
       Its syntax is a comma separated list, with '-' for ranges and '^' for
       excluding a node.

       If --live is specified, set scheduler information of a running guest.  If
       --config is specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If
       --current is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config,
       depending on the current state of the guest.

       For running guests in Linux hosts, the changes made in the domain's numa
       parameters does not imply that the guest memory will be moved to a
       different nodeset immediately. The memory migration depends on the guest
       activity, and the memory of an idle guest will remain in its previous
       nodeset for longer. The presence of VFIO devices will also lock parts of
       the guest memory in the same nodeset used to start the guest, regardless
       of nodeset changes.

   perf
       Syntax:

          perf domain [--enable eventSpec] [--disable eventSpec]
             [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Get the current perf events setting or enable/disable specific perf
       events for a guest domain.

       Perf is a performance analyzing tool in Linux, and it can instrument CPU
       performance counters, tracepoints, kprobes, and uprobes (dynamic
       tracing). Perf supports a list of measurable events, and can measure
       events coming from different sources. For instance, some event are pure
       kernel counters, in this case they are called software events, including
       context-switches, minor-faults, etc.. Now dozens of events from different
       sources can be supported by perf.

       Currently only QEMU/KVM supports this command. The --enable and --disable
       option combined with eventSpec can be used to enable or disable specific
       performance event. eventSpec is a string list of one or more events
       separated by commas. Valid event names are as follows:

       Valid perf event namescmt - A PQos (Platform Qos) feature to monitor the usage of cache by
         applications running on the platform.

       • mbmt - Provides a way to monitor the total system memory bandwidth
         between one level of cache and another.

       • mbml - Provides a way to limit the amount of data (bytes/s) send
         through the memory controller on the socket.

       • cache_misses - Provides the count of cache misses by applications
         running on the platform.

       • cache_references - Provides the count of cache hits by applications
         running on th e platform.

       • instructions - Provides the count of instructions executed by
         applications running on the platform.

       • cpu_cycles - Provides the count of cpu cycles (total/elapsed). May be
         used with instructions in order to get a cycles per instruction.

       • branch_instructions - Provides the count of branch instructions
         executed by applications running on the platform.

       • branch_misses - Provides the count of branch misses executed by
         applications running on the platform.

       • bus_cycles - Provides the count of bus cycles executed by applications
         running on the platform.

       • stalled_cycles_frontend - Provides the count of stalled cpu cycles in
         the frontend of the instruction processor pipeline by applications
         running on the platform.

       • stalled_cycles_backend - Provides the count of stalled cpu cycles in
         the backend of the instruction processor pipeline by applications
         running on the platform.

       • ref_cpu_cycles -  Provides the count of total cpu cycles not affected
         by CPU frequency scaling by applications running on the platform.

       • cpu_clock - Provides the cpu clock time consumed by applications
         running on the platform.

       • task_clock - Provides the task clock time consumed by applications
         running on the platform.

       • page_faults - Provides the count of page faults by applications running
         on the platform.

       • context_switches - Provides the count of context switches by
         applications running on the platform.

       • cpu_migrations - Provides the count cpu migrations by applications
         running on the platform.

       • page_faults_min - Provides the count minor page faults by applications
         running on the platform.

       • page_faults_maj - Provides the count major page faults by applications
         running on the platform.

       • alignment_faults - Provides the count alignment faults by applications
         running on the platform.

       • emulation_faults - Provides the count emulation faults by applications
         running on the platform.

       Note: The statistics can be retrieved using the domstats command using
       the --perf flag.

       If --live is specified, affect a running guest.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If --current is
       specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. If no flag is specified, behavior is
       different depending on hypervisor.

   reboot
       Syntax:

          reboot domain [--mode MODE-LIST]

       Reboot a domain.  This acts just as if the domain had the reboot command
       run from the console.  The command returns as soon as it has executed the
       reboot action, which may be significantly before the domain actually
       reboots.

       The exact behavior of a domain when it reboots is set by the on_reboot
       parameter in the domain's XML definition.

       By default the hypervisor will try to pick a suitable shutdown method. To
       specify an alternative method, the --mode parameter can specify a comma
       separated list which includes acpi, agent, initctl, signal and paravirt.
       The order in which drivers will try each mode is undefined, and not
       related to the order specified to virsh.  For strict control over
       ordering, use a single mode at a time and repeat the command.

   reset
       Syntax:

          reset domain

       Reset a domain immediately without any guest shutdown. reset emulates the
       power reset button on a machine, where all guest hardware sees the RST
       line set and reinitializes internal state.

       Note: Reset without any guest OS shutdown risks data loss.

   restore
       Syntax:

          restore state-file [--bypass-cache] [--xml file]
             [{--running | --paused}]

       Restores a domain from a virsh save state file. See save for more info.

       If --bypass-cache is specified, the restore will avoid the file system
       cache, although this may slow down the operation.

       --xml file is usually omitted, but can be used to supply an alternative
       XML file for use on the restored guest with changes only in the
       host-specific portions of the domain XML.  For example, it can be used to
       account for file naming differences in underlying storage due to disk
       snapshots taken after the guest was saved.

       Normally, restoring a saved image will use the state recorded in the save
       image to decide between running or paused; passing either the --running
       or --paused flag will allow overriding which state the domain should be
       started in.

       Note: To avoid corrupting file system contents within the domain, you
       should not reuse the saved state file for a second restore unless you
       have also reverted all storage volumes back to the same contents as when
       the state file was created.

   resume
       Syntax:

          resume domain

       Moves a domain out of the suspended state.  This will allow a previously
       suspended domain to now be eligible for scheduling by the underlying
       hypervisor.

   save
       Syntax:

          save domain state-file [--bypass-cache] [--xml file]
             [{--running | --paused}] [--verbose]

       Saves a running domain (RAM, but not disk state) to a state file so that
       it can be restored later.  Once saved, the domain will no longer be
       running on the system, thus the memory allocated for the domain will be
       free for other domains to use.  virsh restore restores from this state
       file.  If --bypass-cache is specified, the save will avoid the file
       system cache, although this may slow down the operation.

       The progress may be monitored using domjobinfo virsh command and canceled
       with domjobabort command (sent by another virsh instance). Another option
       is to send SIGINT (usually with Ctrl-C) to the virsh process running save
       command. --verbose displays the progress of save.

       This is roughly equivalent to doing a hibernate on a running computer,
       with all the same limitations.  Open network connections may be severed
       upon restore, as TCP timeouts may have expired.

       --xml file is usually omitted, but can be used to supply an alternative
       XML file for use on the restored guest with changes only in the
       host-specific portions of the domain XML.  For example, it can be used to
       account for file naming differences that are planned to be made via disk
       snapshots of underlying storage after the guest is saved.

       Normally, restoring a saved image will decide between running or paused
       based on the state the domain was in when the save was done; passing
       either the --running or --paused flag will allow overriding which state
       the restore should use.

       Domain saved state files assume that disk images will be unchanged
       between the creation and restore point.  For a more complete system
       restore point, where the disk state is saved alongside the memory state,
       see the snapshot family of commands.

   save-image-define
       Syntax:

          save-image-define file xml [{--running | --paused}]

       Update the domain XML that will be used when file is later used in the
       restore command.  The xml argument must be a file name containing the
       alternative XML, with changes only in the host-specific portions of the
       domain XML.  For example, it can be used to account for file naming
       differences resulting from creating disk snapshots of underlying storage
       after the guest was saved.

       The save image records whether the domain should be restored to a running
       or paused state.  Normally, this command does not alter the recorded
       state; passing either the --running or --paused flag will allow
       overriding which state the restore should use.

   save-image-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          save-image-dumpxml file [--security-info]

       Extract the domain XML that was in effect at the time the saved state
       file file was created with the save command.  Using --security-info will
       also include security sensitive information.

   save-image-edit
       Syntax:

          save-image-edit file [{--running | --paused}]

       Edit the XML configuration associated with a saved state file file
       created by the save command.

       The save image records whether the domain should be restored to a running
       or paused state.  Normally, this command does not alter the recorded
       state; passing either the --running or --paused flag will allow
       overriding which state the restore should use.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh save-image-dumpxml state-file > state-file.xml
          vi state-file.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh save-image-define state-file state-file-xml

       except that it does some error checking.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

   schedinfo
       Syntax:

          schedinfo domain [[--config] [--live] | [--current]] [[--set] parameter=value]...
          schedinfo [--weight number] [--cap number] domain

       Allows you to show (and set) the domain scheduler parameters. The
       parameters available for each hypervisor are:

       LXC (posix scheduler) : cpu_shares, vcpu_period, vcpu_quota

       QEMU/KVM (posix scheduler): cpu_shares, vcpu_period, vcpu_quota,
       emulator_period, emulator_quota, global_period, global_quota,
       iothread_period, iothread_quota

       Xen (credit scheduler): weight, cap

       ESX (allocation scheduler): reservation, limit, shares

       If --live is specified, set scheduler information of a running guest.  If
       --config is specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If
       --current is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config,
       depending on the current state of the guest.

       Note: The cpu_shares parameter has a valid value range of 2-262144.

       Note: The weight and cap parameters are defined only for the XEN_CREDIT
       scheduler.

       Note: The vcpu_period, emulator_period, and iothread_period parameters
       have a valid value range of 1000-1000000 or 0, and the vcpu_quota,
       emulator_quota, and iothread_quota parameters have a valid value range of
       1000-17592186044415 or less than 0. The value 0 for either parameter is
       the same as not specifying that parameter.

   screenshot
       Syntax:

          screenshot domain [imagefilepath] [--screen screenID]

       Takes a screenshot of a current domain console and stores it into a file.
       Optionally, if the hypervisor supports more displays for a domain,
       screenID allows specifying which screen will be captured. It is the
       sequential number of screen. In case of multiple graphics cards, heads
       are enumerated before devices, e.g. having two graphics cards, both with
       four heads, screen ID 5 addresses the second head on the second card.

   send-key
       Syntax:

          send-key domain [--codeset codeset] [--holdtime holdtime] keycode...

       Parse the keycode sequence as keystrokes to send to domain.  Each keycode
       can either be a numeric value or a symbolic name from the corresponding
       codeset.  If --holdtime is given, each keystroke will be held for that
       many milliseconds.  The default codeset is linux, but use of the
       --codeset option allows other codesets to be chosen.

       If multiple keycodes are specified, they are all sent simultaneously to
       the guest, and they may be received in random order. If you need distinct
       keypresses, you must use multiple send-key invocations.

       • linux

         The numeric values are those defined by the Linux generic input event
         subsystem. The symbolic names match the corresponding Linux key
         constant macro names.

         See virkeycode-linux(7) and virkeyname-linux(7)xt

         The numeric values are those defined by the original XT keyboard
         controller. No symbolic names are provided

         See virkeycode-xt(7)atset1

         The numeric values are those defined by the AT keyboard controller, set
         1 (aka XT compatible set). Extended keycoes from atset1 may differ from
         extended keycodes in the xt codeset. No symbolic names are provided

         See virkeycode-atset1(7)atset2

         The numeric values are those defined by the AT keyboard controller, set
         2. No symbolic names are provided

         See virkeycode-atset2(7)atset3

         The numeric values are those defined by the AT keyboard controller, set
         3 (aka PS/2 compatible set). No symbolic names are provided

         See virkeycode-atset3(7)os_x

         The numeric values are those defined by the macOS keyboard input
         subsystem. The symbolic names match the corresponding macOS key
         constant macro names

         See virkeycode-osx(7) and virkeyname-osx(7)xt_kbd

         The numeric values are those defined by the Linux KBD device.  These
         are a variant on the original XT codeset, but often with different
         encoding for extended keycodes. No symbolic names are provided.

         See virkeycode-xtkbd(7)win32

         The numeric values are those defined by the Win32 keyboard input
         subsystem. The symbolic names match the corresponding Win32 key
         constant macro names

         See virkeycode-win32(7) and virkeyname-win32(7)usb

         The numeric values are those defined by the USB HID specification for
         keyboard input. No symbolic names are provided

         See virkeycode-usb(7)qnum

         The numeric values are those defined by the QNUM extension for sending
         raw keycodes. These are a variant on the XT codeset, but extended
         keycodes have the low bit of the second byte set, instead of the high
         bit of the first byte. No symbolic names are provided.

         See virkeycode-qnum(7)

       Examples:

          # send three strokes 'k', 'e', 'y', using xt codeset. these
          # are all pressed simultaneously and may be received by the guest
          # in random order
          virsh send-key dom --codeset xt 37 18 21

          # send one stroke 'right-ctrl+C'
          virsh send-key dom KEY_RIGHTCTRL KEY_C

          # send a tab, held for 1 second
          virsh send-key --holdtime 1000 0xf

   send-process-signal
       Syntax:

          send-process-signal domain-id pid signame

       Send a signal signame to the process identified by pid running in the
       virtual domain domain-id. The pid is a process ID in the virtual domain
       namespace.

       The signame argument may be either an integer signal constant number, or
       one of the symbolic names:

          "nop", "hup", "int", "quit", "ill",
          "trap", "abrt", "bus", "fpe", "kill",
          "usr1", "segv", "usr2", "pipe", "alrm",
          "term", "stkflt", "chld", "cont", "stop",
          "tstp", "ttin", "ttou", "urg", "xcpu",
          "xfsz", "vtalrm", "prof", "winch", "poll",
          "pwr", "sys", "rt0", "rt1", "rt2", "rt3",
          "rt4", "rt5", "rt6", "rt7", "rt8", "rt9",
          "rt10", "rt11", "rt12", "rt13", "rt14", "rt15",
          "rt16", "rt17", "rt18", "rt19", "rt20", "rt21",
          "rt22", "rt23", "rt24", "rt25", "rt26", "rt27",
          "rt28", "rt29", "rt30", "rt31", "rt32"

       The symbol name may optionally be prefixed with sig or sig_ and may be in
       uppercase or lowercase.

       Examples:

          virsh send-process-signal myguest 1 15
          virsh send-process-signal myguest 1 term
          virsh send-process-signal myguest 1 sigterm
          virsh send-process-signal myguest 1 SIG_HUP

   set-lifecycle-action
       Syntax:

          set-lifecycle-action domain type action
             [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Set the lifecycle action for specified lifecycle type.  The valid types
       are "poweroff", "reboot" and "crash", and for each of them valid action
       is one of "destroy", "restart", "rename-restart", "preserve".  For type
       "crash", additional actions "coredump-destroy" and "coredump-restart" are
       supported.

   set-user-password
       Syntax:

          set-user-password domain user password [--encrypted]

       Set the password for the user account in the guest domain.

       If --encrypted is specified, the password is assumed to be already
       encrypted by the method required by the guest OS.

       For QEMU/KVM, this requires the guest agent to be configured and running.

   set-user-sshkeys
       Syntax:

          set-user-sshkeys domain user [--file FILE] [{--reset | --remove}]

       Append keys read from FILE into user's SSH authorized keys file in the
       guest domain.  In the FILE keys must be on separate lines and each line
       must follow authorized keys format as defined by sshd(8).

       If --reset is specified, then the guest authorized keys file content is
       removed before appending new keys. As a special case, if --reset is
       provided and no FILE was provided then no new keys are added and the
       authorized keys file is cleared out.

       If --remove is specified, then instead of adding any new keys then keys
       read from FILE are removed from the authorized keys file. It is not
       considered an error if the key does not exist in the file.

   setmaxmem
       Syntax:

          setmaxmem domain size [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Change the maximum memory allocation limit for a guest domain.  If --live
       is specified, affect a running guest.  If --config is specified, affect
       the next start of a persistent guest.  If --current is specified, it is
       equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on the current state
       of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be given, but --current
       is exclusive. If no flag is specified, behavior is different depending on
       hypervisor.

       Some hypervisors such as QEMU/KVM don't support live changes (especially
       increasing) of the maximum memory limit.  Even persistent configuration
       changes might not be performed with some hypervisors/configuration (e.g.
       on NUMA enabled domains on QEMU).  For complex configuration changes use
       command edit instead).

       size is a scaled integer (see NOTES above); it defaults to kibibytes
       (blocks of 1024 bytes) unless you provide a suffix (and the older option
       name --kilobytes is available as a deprecated synonym) .  Libvirt rounds
       up to the nearest kibibyte.  Some hypervisors require a larger
       granularity than KiB, and requests that are not an even multiple will be
       rounded up.  For example, vSphere/ESX rounds the parameter up to
       mebibytes (1024 kibibytes).

   setmem
       Syntax:

          setmem domain size [[--config] [--live] | [--current]]

       Change the memory allocation for a guest domain.  If --live is specified,
       perform a memory balloon of a running guest.  If --config is specified,
       affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If --current is specified,
       it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on the current
       state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be given, but
       --current is exclusive. If no flag is specified, behavior is different
       depending on hypervisor.

       size is a scaled integer (see NOTES above); it defaults to kibibytes
       (blocks of 1024 bytes) unless you provide a suffix (and the older option
       name --kilobytes is available as a deprecated synonym) .  Libvirt rounds
       up to the nearest kibibyte.  Some hypervisors require a larger
       granularity than KiB, and requests that are not an even multiple will be
       rounded up.  For example, vSphere/ESX rounds the parameter up to
       mebibytes (1024 kibibytes).

       For Xen, you can only adjust the memory of a running domain if the domain
       is paravirtualized or running the PV balloon driver.

       For LXC, the value being set is the cgroups value for limit_in_bytes or
       the maximum amount of user memory (including file cache). When viewing
       memory inside the container, this is the /proc/meminfo "MemTotal" value.
       When viewing the value from the host, use the virsh memtune command. In
       order to view the current memory in use and the maximum value allowed to
       set memory, use the virsh dominfo command.

   setvcpus
       Syntax:

          setvcpus domain count [--maximum] [[--config] [--live] | [--current]] [--guest] [--hotpluggable]

       Change the number of virtual CPUs active in a guest domain.  By default,
       this command works on active guest domains.  To change the settings for
       an inactive guest domain, use the --config flag.

       The count value may be limited by host, hypervisor, or a limit coming
       from the original description of the guest domain. For Xen, you can only
       adjust the virtual CPUs of a running domain if the domain is
       paravirtualized.

       If the --config flag is specified, the change is made to the stored XML
       configuration for the guest domain, and will only take effect when the
       guest domain is next started.

       If --live is specified, the guest domain must be active, and the change
       takes place immediately.  Both the --config and --live flags may be
       specified together if supported by the hypervisor.  If this command is
       run before the guest has finished booting, the guest may fail to process
       the change.

       If --current is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config,
       depending on the current state of the guest.

       When no flags are given, the --live flag is assumed and the guest domain
       must be active.  In this situation it is up to the hypervisor whether the
       --config flag is also assumed, and therefore whether the XML
       configuration is adjusted to make the change persistent.

       If --guest is specified, then the count of cpus is modified in the guest
       instead of the hypervisor. This flag is usable only for live domains and
       may require guest agent to be configured in the guest.

       To allow adding vcpus to persistent definitions that can be later
       hotunplugged after the domain is booted it is necessary to specify the
       --hotpluggable flag. Vcpus added to live domains supporting vcpu unplug
       are automatically marked as hotpluggable.

       The --maximum flag controls the maximum number of virtual cpus that can
       be hot-plugged the next time the domain is booted.  As such, it must only
       be used with the --config flag, and not with the --live or the --current
       flag. Note that it may not be possible to change the maximum vcpu count
       if the processor topology is specified for the guest.

   setvcpu
       Syntax:

          setvcpu domain vcpulist [--enable] | [--disable]
             [[--live] [--config] | [--current]]

       Change state of individual vCPUs using hot(un)plug mechanism.

       See vcpupin for information on format of vcpulist. Hypervisor drivers may
       require that vcpulist contains exactly vCPUs belonging to one
       hotpluggable entity. This is usually just a single vCPU but certain
       architectures such as ppc64 require a full core to be specified at once.

       Note that hypervisors may refuse to disable certain vcpus such as vcpu 0
       or others.

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  This is the default. Both --live and
       --config flags may be given, but --current is exclusive.

   shutdown
       Syntax:

          shutdown domain [--mode MODE-LIST]

       Gracefully shuts down a domain.  This coordinates with the domain OS to
       perform graceful shutdown, so there is no guarantee that it will succeed,
       and may take a variable length of time depending on what services must be
       shutdown in the domain.

       The exact behavior of a domain when it shuts down is set by the
       on_poweroff parameter in the domain's XML definition.

       If domain is transient, then the metadata of any snapshots and
       checkpoints will be lost once the guest stops running, but the underlying
       contents still exist, and a new domain with the same name and UUID can
       restore the snapshot metadata with snapshot-create, and the checkpoint
       metadata with checkpoint-create.

       By default the hypervisor will try to pick a suitable shutdown method. To
       specify an alternative method, the --mode parameter can specify a comma
       separated list which includes acpi, agent, initctl, signal and paravirt.
       The order in which drivers will try each mode is undefined, and not
       related to the order specified to virsh.  For strict control over
       ordering, use a single mode at a time and repeat the command.

   start
       Syntax:

          start domain-name-or-uuid [--console] [--paused]
             [--autodestroy] [--bypass-cache] [--force-boot]
             [--pass-fds N,M,...]

       Start a (previously defined) inactive domain, either from the last
       managedsave state, or via a fresh boot if no managedsave state is
       present.  The domain will be paused if the --paused option is used and
       supported by the driver; otherwise it will be running.  If --console is
       requested, attach to the console after creation.  If --autodestroy is
       requested, then the guest will be automatically destroyed when virsh
       closes its connection to libvirt, or otherwise exits.  If --bypass-cache
       is specified, and managedsave state exists, the restore will avoid the
       file system cache, although this may slow down the operation.  If
       --force-boot is specified, then any managedsave state is discarded and a
       fresh boot occurs.

       If --pass-fds is specified, the argument is a comma separated list of
       open file descriptors which should be pass on into the guest. The file
       descriptors will be re-numbered in the guest, starting from 3. This is
       only supported with container based virtualization.

   suspend
       Syntax:

          suspend domain

       Suspend a running domain. It is kept in memory but won't be scheduled
       anymore.

   ttyconsole
       Syntax:

          ttyconsole domain

       Output the device used for the TTY console of the domain. If the
       information is not available the processes will provide an exit code of
       1.

   undefine
       Syntax:

          undefine domain [--managed-save] [--snapshots-metadata]
             [--checkpoints-metadata] [--nvram] [--keep-nvram]
             [ {--storage volumes | --remove-all-storage
                [--delete-storage-volume-snapshots]} --wipe-storage]

       Undefine a domain. If the domain is running, this converts it to a
       transient domain, without stopping it. If the domain is inactive, the
       domain configuration is removed.

       The --managed-save flag guarantees that any managed save image (see the
       managedsave command) is also cleaned up.  Without the flag, attempts to
       undefine a domain with a managed save image will fail.

       The --snapshots-metadata flag guarantees that any snapshots (see the
       snapshot-list command) are also cleaned up when undefining an inactive
       domain.  Without the flag, attempts to undefine an inactive domain with
       snapshot metadata will fail.  If the domain is active, this flag is
       ignored.

       The --checkpoints-metadata flag guarantees that any checkpoints (see the
       checkpoint-list command) are also cleaned up when undefining an inactive
       domain.  Without the flag, attempts to undefine an inactive domain with
       checkpoint metadata will fail.  If the domain is active, this flag is
       ignored.

       --nvram and --keep-nvram specify accordingly to delete or keep nvram
       (/domain/os/nvram/) file. If the domain has an nvram file and the flags
       are omitted, the undefine will fail.

       The --storage flag takes a parameter volumes, which is a comma separated
       list of volume target names or source paths of storage volumes to be
       removed along with the undefined domain. Volumes can be undefined and
       thus removed only on inactive domains. Volume deletion is only attempted
       after the domain is undefined; if not all of the requested volumes could
       be deleted, the error message indicates what still remains behind. If a
       volume path is not found in the domain definition, it's treated as if the
       volume was successfully deleted. Only volumes managed by libvirt in
       storage pools can be removed this way.  (See domblklist for list of
       target names associated to a domain).  Example: --storage
       vda,/path/to/storage.img

       The --remove-all-storage flag specifies that all of the domain's storage
       volumes should be deleted.

       The --delete-storage-volume-snapshots (previously --delete-snapshots)
       flag specifies that any snapshots associated with the storage volume
       should be deleted as well. Requires the --remove-all-storage flag to be
       provided. Not all storage drivers support this option, presently only
       rbd. Using this when also removing volumes handled by a storage driver
       which does not support the flag will result in failure.

       The flag --wipe-storage specifies that the storage volumes should be
       wiped before removal.

       NOTE: For an inactive domain, the domain name or UUID must be used as the
       domain.

   vcpucount
       Syntax:

          vcpucount domain  [{--maximum | --active}
             {--config | --live | --current}] [--guest]

       Print information about the virtual cpu counts of the given domain.  If
       no flags are specified, all possible counts are listed in a table;
       otherwise, the output is limited to just the numeric value requested.
       For historical reasons, the table lists the label "current" on the rows
       that can be queried in isolation via the --active flag, rather than
       relating to the --current flag.

       --maximum requests information on the maximum cap of vcpus that a domain
       can add via setvcpus, while --active shows the current usage; these two
       flags cannot both be specified.  --config requires a persistent guest and
       requests information regarding the next time the domain will be booted,
       --live requires a running domain and lists current values, and --current
       queries according to the current state of the domain (corresponding to
       --live if running, or --config if inactive); these three flags are
       mutually exclusive.

       If --guest is specified, then the count of cpus is reported from the
       perspective of the guest. This flag is usable only for live domains and
       may require guest agent to be configured in the guest.

   vcpuinfo
       Syntax:

          vcpuinfo domain [--pretty]

       Returns basic information about the domain virtual CPUs, like the number
       of vCPUs, the running time, the affinity to physical processors.

       With --pretty, cpu affinities are shown as ranges.

       Example:

          $ virsh vcpuinfo fedora
          VCPU:           0
          CPU:            0
          State:          running
          CPU time:       7,0s
          CPU Affinity:   yyyy

          VCPU:           1
          CPU:            1
          State:          running
          CPU time:       0,7s
          CPU Affinity:   yyyy

       STATES

       The State field displays the current operating state of a virtual CPU

       • offline

         The virtual CPU is offline and not usable by the domain.  This state is
         not supported by all hypervisors.

       • running

         The virtual CPU is available to the domain and is operating.

       • blocked

         The virtual CPU is available to the domain but is waiting for a
         resource.  This state is not supported by all hypervisors, in which
         case running may be reported instead.

       • no state

         The virtual CPU state could not be determined. This could happen if the
         hypervisor is newer than virsh.

       • N/A

         There's no information about the virtual CPU state available. This can
         be the case if the domain is not running or the hypervisor does not
         report the virtual CPU state.

   vcpupin
       Syntax:

          vcpupin domain [vcpu] [cpulist] [[--live] [--config] | [--current]]

       Query or change the pinning of domain VCPUs to host physical CPUs.  To
       pin a single vcpu, specify cpulist; otherwise, you can query one vcpu or
       omit vcpu to list all at once.

       cpulist is a list of physical CPU numbers. Its syntax is a comma
       separated list and a special markup using '-' and '^' (ex. '0-4',
       '0-3,^2') can also be allowed. The '-' denotes the range and the '^'
       denotes exclusive.  For pinning the vcpu to all physical cpus specify 'r'
       as a cpulist.  If --live is specified, affect a running guest.  If
       --config is specified, affect the next start of a persistent guest.  If
       --current is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config,
       depending on the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config
       flags may be given if cpulist is present, but --current is exclusive.  If
       no flag is specified, behavior is different depending on hypervisor.

       Note: The expression is sequentially evaluated, so "0-15,^8" is identical
       to "9-14,0-7,15" but not identical to "^8,0-15".

   vncdisplay
       Syntax:

          vncdisplay domain

       Output the IP address and port number for the VNC display. If the
       information is not available the processes will provide an exit code of
       1.

DEVICE COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate devices associated to domains.  The
       domain can be specified as a short integer, a name or a full UUID.  To
       better understand the values allowed as options for the command reading
       the documentation at https://libvirt.org/formatdomain.html on the format
       of the device sections to get the most accurate set of accepted values.

   attach-device
       Syntax:

          attach-device domain FILE [[[--live] [--config] | [--current]] | [--persistent]]

       Attach a device to the domain, using a device definition in an XML file
       using a device definition element such as <disk> or <interface> as the
       top-level element.  See the documentation at
       https://libvirt.org/formatdomain.html#elementsDevices to learn about
       libvirt XML format for a device.  If --config is specified the command
       alters the persistent guest configuration with the device attach taking
       effect the next time libvirt starts the domain.  For cdrom and floppy
       devices, this command only replaces the media within an existing device;
       consider using update-device for this usage.  For passthrough host
       devices, see also nodedev-detach, needed if the PCI device does not use
       managed mode.

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. When no flag is specified legacy API
       is used whose behavior depends on the hypervisor driver.

       For compatibility purposes, --persistent behaves like --config for an
       offline domain, and like --live --config for a running domain.

       Note: using of partial device definition XML files may lead to unexpected
       results as some fields may be autogenerated and thus match devices other
       than expected.

   attach-disk
       Syntax:

          attach-disk domain source target [[[--live] [--config] |
             [--current]] | [--persistent]] [--targetbus bus]
             [--driver driver] [--subdriver subdriver] [--iothread iothread]
             [--cache cache] [--io io] [--type type] [--alias alias]
             [--mode mode] [--sourcetype sourcetype]
             [--source-protocol protocol] [--source-host-name hostname:port]
             [--source-host-transport transport] [--source-host-socket socket]
             [--serial serial] [--wwn wwn] [--rawio] [--address address]
             [--multifunction] [--print-xml]

       Attach a new disk device to the domain.  source is path for the files and
       devices unless --source-protocol is specified, in which case source is
       the name of a network disk.  target controls the bus or device under
       which the disk is exposed to the guest OS. It indicates the "logical"
       device name; the optional targetbus attribute specifies the type of disk
       device to emulate; possible values are driver specific, with typical
       values being ide, scsi, virtio, xen, usb, sata, or sd, if omitted, the
       bus type is inferred from the style of the device name (e.g.  a device
       named 'sda' will typically be exported using a SCSI bus).  driver can be
       file, tap or phy for the Xen hypervisor depending on the kind of access;
       or qemu for the QEMU emulator.  Further details to the driver can be
       passed using subdriver. For Xen subdriver can be aio, while for QEMU
       subdriver should match the format of the disk source, such as raw or
       qcow2.  Hypervisor default will be used if subdriver is not specified.
       However, the default may not be correct, esp. for QEMU as for security
       reasons it is configured not to detect disk formats.  type can indicate
       lun, cdrom or floppy as alternative to the disk default, although this
       use only replaces the media within the existing virtual cdrom or floppy
       device; consider using update-device for this usage instead.  alias can
       set user supplied alias.  mode can specify the two specific mode readonly
       or shareable.  sourcetype can indicate the type of source
       (block|file|network) cache can be one of "default", "none",
       "writethrough", "writeback", "directsync" or "unsafe".  io controls
       specific policies on I/O; QEMU guests support "threads", "native" and
       "io_uring".  iothread is the number within the range of domain IOThreads
       to which this disk may be attached (QEMU only).  serial is the serial of
       disk device. wwn is the wwn of disk device.  rawio indicates the disk
       needs rawio capability.  address is the address of disk device in the
       form of pci:domain.bus.slot.function, scsi:controller.bus.unit,
       ide:controller.bus.unit, usb:bus.port, sata:controller.bus.unit or
       ccw:cssid.ssid.devno. Virtio-ccw devices must have their cssid set to
       0xfe.  multifunction indicates specified pci address is a multifunction
       pci device address.

       There is also support for using a network disk. As specified, the user
       can provide a --source-protocol in which case the source parameter will
       be interpreted as the source name. --source-protocol must be provided if
       the user intends to provide a network disk or host information.  Host
       information can be provided using the tags --source-host-name,
       --source-host-transport, and --source-host-socket, which respectively
       denote the name of the host, the host's transport method, and the socket
       that the host uses. --source-host-socket and --source-host-name cannot
       both be provided, and the user must provide a --source-host-transport if
       they want to provide a --source-host-socket.  The --source-host-name
       parameter supports host:port syntax if the user wants to provide a port
       as well.

       If --print-xml is specified, then the XML of the disk that would be
       attached is printed instead.

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. When no flag is specified legacy API
       is used whose behavior depends on the hypervisor driver.

       For compatibility purposes, --persistent behaves like --config for an
       offline domain, and like --live --config for a running domain.  Likewise,
       --shareable is an alias for --mode shareable.

   attach-interface
       Syntax:

          attach-interface domain type source [[[--live]
             [--config] | [--current]] | [--persistent]]
             [--target target] [--mac mac] [--script script] [--model model]
             [--inbound average,peak,burst,floor] [--outbound average,peak,burst]
             [--alias alias] [--managed] [--print-xml]
             [--source-mode mode]

       Attach a new network interface to the domain.

       type can be one of the:

       network to indicate connection via a libvirt virtual network,

       bridge to indicate connection via a bridge device on the host,

       direct to indicate connection directly to one of the host's network
       interfaces or bridges,

       hostdev to indicate connection using a passthrough of PCI device on the
       host,

       vhostuser to indicate connection using a virtio transport protocol.

       source indicates the source of the connection.  The source depends on the
       type of the interface:

       network name of the virtual network,

       bridge the name of the bridge device,

       direct the name of the host's interface or bridge,

       hostdev the PCI address of the host's interface formatted as
       domain:bus:slot.function.

       vhostuser the path to UNIX socket (control plane)

       --target is used to specify the tap/macvtap device to be used to connect
       the domain to the source.  Names starting with 'vnet' are considered as
       auto-generated and are blanked out/regenerated each time the interface is
       attached.

       --mac specifies the MAC address of the network interface; if a MAC
       address is not given, a new address will be automatically generated (and
       stored in the persistent configuration if "--config" is given on the
       command line).

       --script is used to specify a path to a custom script to be called while
       attaching to a bridge - this will be called instead of the default script
       not in addition to it.  This is valid only for interfaces of bridge type
       and only for Xen domains.

       --model specifies the network device model to be presented to the domain.

       alias can set user supplied alias.

       --inbound and --outbound control the bandwidth of the interface.  At
       least one from the average, floor pair must be specified.  The other two
       peak and burst are optional, so "average,peak", "average,,burst",
       "average,,,floor", "average" and ",,,floor" are also legal.  Values for
       average, floor and peak are expressed in kilobytes per second, while
       burst is expressed in kilobytes in a single burst at peak speed as
       described in the Network XML documentation at
       https://libvirt.org/formatnetwork.html#elementQoS.

       --managed is usable only for hostdev type and tells libvirt that the
       interface should be managed, which means detached and reattached from/to
       the host by libvirt.

       --source-mode is mandatory for vhostuser interface and accepts values
       server and client that control whether hypervisor waits for the other
       process to connect, or initiates connection, respectively.

       If --print-xml is specified, then the XML of the interface that would be
       attached is printed instead.

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, affect the current domain state, which can either be live
       or offline.  Both --live and --config flags may be given, but --current
       is exclusive.  When no flag is specified legacy API is used whose
       behavior depends on the hypervisor driver.

       For compatibility purposes, --persistent behaves like --config for an
       offline domain, and like --live --config for a running domain.

       Note: the optional target value is the name of a device to be created as
       the back-end on the node.  If not provided a device named "vnetN" or
       "vifN" will be created automatically.

   detach-device
       Syntax:

          detach-device domain FILE [[[--live] [--config] |
             [--current]] | [--persistent]]

       Detach a device from the domain, takes the same kind of XML descriptions
       as command attach-device.  For passthrough host devices, see also
       nodedev-reattach, needed if the device does not use managed mode.

       Note: The supplied XML description of the device should be as specific as
       its definition in the domain XML. The set of attributes used to match the
       device are internal to the drivers. Using a partial definition, or
       attempting to detach a device that is not present in the domain XML, but
       shares some specific attributes with one that is present, may lead to
       unexpected results.

       Quirk: Device unplug is asynchronous in most cases and requires guest
       cooperation. This means that it's up to the discretion of the guest to
       disallow or delay the unplug arbitrarily. As the libvirt API used in this
       command was designed as synchronous it returns success after some timeout
       even if the device was not unplugged yet to allow further interactions
       with the domain e.g. if the guest is unresponsive. Callers which need to
       make sure that the device was unplugged can use libvirt events (see virsh
       event) to be notified when the device is removed. Note that the event may
       arrive before the command returns.

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. When no flag is specified legacy API
       is used whose behavior depends on the hypervisor driver.

       For compatibility purposes, --persistent behaves like --config for an
       offline domain, and like --live --config for a running domain.

       Note that older versions of virsh used --config as an alias for
       --persistent.

   detach-device-alias
       Syntax:

          detach-device-alias domain alias [[[--live] [--config] | [--current]]]]

       Detach a device with given alias from the domain. This command returns
       successfully after the unplug request was sent to the hypervisor. The
       actual removal of the device is notified asynchronously via libvirt
       events (see virsh event).

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive.

   detach-disk
       Syntax:

          detach-disk domain target [[[--live] [--config] |
             [--current]] | [--persistent]] [--print-xml]

       Detach a disk device from a domain. The target is the device as seen from
       the domain.

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. When no flag is specified legacy API
       is used whose behavior depends on the hypervisor driver.

       For compatibility purposes, --persistent behaves like --config for an
       offline domain, and like --live --config for a running domain.

       Note that older versions of virsh used --config as an alias for
       --persistent.

       If --print-xml is specified, then the XML which would be used to detach
       the disk is printed instead.

       Please see documentation for detach-device for known quirks.

   detach-interface
       Syntax:

          detach-interface domain type [--mac mac]
             [[[--live] [--config] | [--current]] | [--persistent]]

       Detach a network interface from a domain.  type can be either network to
       indicate a physical network device or bridge to indicate a bridge to a
       device. It is recommended to use the mac option to distinguish between
       the interfaces if more than one are present on the domain.

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. When no flag is specified legacy API
       is used whose behavior depends on the hypervisor driver.

       For compatibility purposes, --persistent behaves like --config for an
       offline domain, and like --live --config for a running domain.

       Note that older versions of virsh used --config as an alias for
       --persistent.

       Please see documentation for detach-device for known quirks.

   update-device
       Syntax:

          update-device domain file [--force] [[[--live]
             [--config] | [--current]] | [--persistent]]

       Update the characteristics of a device associated with domain, based on
       the device definition in an XML file.  The --force option can be used to
       force device update, e.g., to eject a CD-ROM even if it is locked/mounted
       in the domain. See the documentation at
       https://libvirt.org/formatdomain.html#elementsDevices to learn about
       libvirt XML format for a device.

       If --live is specified, affect a running domain.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent guest.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. Not specifying any flag is the same as
       specifying --current.

       For compatibility purposes, --persistent behaves like --config for an
       offline domain, and like --live --config for a running domain.

       Note that older versions of virsh used --config as an alias for
       --persistent.

       Note: using of partial device definition XML files may lead to unexpected
       results as some fields may be autogenerated and thus match devices other
       than expected.

   change-media
       Syntax:

          change-media domain path [--eject] [--insert]
             [--update] [source] [--force] [[--live] [--config] |
             [--current]] [--print-xml] [--block]

       Change media of CDROM or floppy drive. path can be the fully-qualified
       path or the unique target name (<target dev='hdc'>) of the disk device.
       source specifies the path of the media to be inserted or updated. The
       --block flag allows setting the backing type in case a block device is
       used as media for the CDROM or floppy drive instead of a file.

       --eject indicates the media will be ejected.  --insert indicates the
       media will be inserted. source must be specified.  If the device has
       source (e.g. <source file='media'>), and source is not specified,
       --update is equal to --eject. If the device has no source, and source is
       specified, --update is equal to --insert. If the device has source, and
       source is specified, --update behaves like combination of --eject and
       --insert.  If none of --eject, --insert, and --update is specified,
       --update is used by default.  The --force option can be used to force
       media changing.  If --live is specified, alter live configuration of
       running guest.  If --config is specified, alter persistent configuration,
       effect observed on next startup of the guest.  --current can be either or
       both of live and config, depends on the hypervisor's implementation.
       Both --live and --config flags may be given, but --current is exclusive.
       If no flag is specified, behavior is different depending on hypervisor.
       If --print-xml is specified, the XML that would be used to change media
       is printed instead of changing the media.

NODEDEV COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate host devices that are intended to be
       passed through to guest domains via <hostdev> elements in a domain's
       <devices> section.  A node device key is generally specified by the bus
       name followed by its address, using underscores between all components,
       such as pci_0000_00_02_1, usb_1_5_3, or net_eth1_00_27_13_6a_fe_00.  The
       nodedev-list gives the full list of host devices that are known to
       libvirt, although this includes devices that cannot be assigned to a
       guest (for example, attempting to detach the PCI device that controls the
       host's hard disk controller where the guest's disk images live could
       cause the host system to lock up or reboot).

       For more information on node device definition see:
       https://libvirt.org/formatnode.html.

       Passthrough devices cannot be simultaneously used by the host and its
       guest domains, nor by multiple active guests at once.  If the <hostdev>
       description of a PCI device includes the attribute managed='yes', and the
       hypervisor driver supports it, then the device is in managed mode, and
       attempts to use that passthrough device in an active guest will
       automatically behave as if nodedev-detach (guest start, device hot-plug)
       and nodedev-reattach (guest stop, device hot-unplug) were called at the
       right points.  If a PCI device is not marked as managed, then it must
       manually be detached before guests can use it, and manually reattached to
       be returned to the host.  Also, if a device is manually detached, then
       the host does not regain control of the device without a matching
       reattach, even if the guests use the device in managed mode.

   nodedev-create
       Syntax:

          nodedev-create FILE

       Create a device on the host node that can then be assigned to virtual
       machines. Normally, libvirt is able to automatically determine which host
       nodes are available for use, but this allows registration of host
       hardware that libvirt did not automatically detect.  file contains xml
       for a top-level <device> description of a node device.

   nodedev-destroy
       Syntax:

          nodedev-destroy device

       Destroy (stop) a device on the host. device can be either device name or
       wwn pair in "wwnn,wwpn" format (only works for vHBA currently).  Note
       that this makes libvirt quit managing a host device, and may even make
       that device unusable by the rest of the physical host until a reboot.

   nodedev-define
       Syntax:

          nodedev-define FILE

       Define an inactive persistent device or modify an existing persistent one
       from the XML FILE.

   nodedev-undefine
       Syntax:

          nodedev-undefine device

       Undefine the configuration for a persistent device. If the device is
       active, make it transient.

   nodedev-start
       Syntax:

          nodedev-start network

       Start a (previously defined) inactive device.

   nodedev-detach
       Syntax:

          nodedev-detach nodedev [--driver backend_driver]

       Detach nodedev from the host, so that it can safely be used by guests via
       <hostdev> passthrough.  This is reversed with nodedev-reattach, and is
       done automatically for managed devices.

       Different backend drivers expect the device to be bound to different
       dummy devices. For example, QEMU's "kvm" backend driver (the default)
       expects the device to be bound to pci-stub, but its "vfio" backend driver
       expects the device to be bound to vfio-pci. The --driver parameter can be
       used to specify the desired backend driver.

   nodedev-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          nodedev-dumpxml device

       Dump a <device> XML representation for the given node device, including
       such information as the device name, which bus owns the device, the
       vendor and product id, and any capabilities of the device usable by
       libvirt (such as whether device reset is supported). device can be either
       device name or wwn pair in "wwnn,wwpn" format (only works for HBA).

   nodedev-info
       Syntax:

          nodedev-info device

       Returns basic information about the device object.

   nodedev-list
       Syntax:

          nodedev-list [--cap capability] [--tree] [--inactive | --all]

       List all of the devices available on the node that are known by libvirt.
       cap is used to filter the list by capability types, the types must be
       separated by comma, e.g. --cap pci,scsi. Valid capability types include
       'system', 'pci', 'usb_device', 'usb', 'net', 'scsi_host', 'scsi_target',
       'scsi', 'storage', 'fc_host', 'vports', 'scsi_generic', 'drm', 'mdev',
       'mdev_types', 'ccw', 'css', 'ap_card', 'ap_queue', 'ap_matrix'. By
       default, only active devices are listed. --inactive is used to list only
       inactive devices, and -all is used to list both active and inactive
       devices.  If --tree is used, the output is formatted in a tree
       representing parents of each node.  --tree is mutually exclusive with all
       other options.

   nodedev-reattach
       Syntax:

          nodedev-reattach nodedev

       Declare that nodedev is no longer in use by any guests, and that the host
       can resume normal use of the device.  This is done automatically for PCI
       devices in managed mode and USB devices, but must be done explicitly to
       match any explicit nodedev-detach.

   nodedev-reset
       Syntax:

          nodedev-reset nodedev

       Trigger a device reset for nodedev, useful prior to transferring a node
       device between guest passthrough or the host.  Libvirt will often do this
       action implicitly when required, but this command allows an explicit
       reset when needed.

   nodedev-event
       Syntax:

          nodedev-event {[nodedev] event [--loop] [--timeout seconds] [--timestamp] | --list}

       Wait for a class of node device events to occur, and print appropriate
       details of events as they happen.  The events can optionally be filtered
       by nodedev.  Using --list as the only argument will provide a list of
       possible event values known by this client, although the connection might
       not allow registering for all these events.

       By default, this command is one-shot, and returns success once an event
       occurs; you can send SIGINT (usually via Ctrl-C) to quit immediately.  If
       --timeout is specified, the command gives up waiting for events after
       seconds have elapsed.   With --loop, the command prints all events until
       a timeout or interrupt key.

       When --timestamp is used, a human-readable timestamp will be printed
       before the event.

   nodedev-autostart
       Syntax:

          nodedev-autostart [--disable] device

       Configure a device to be automatically started when the host machine
       boots or the parent device becomes available. With --disable, the device
       will be set to manual mode and will no longer be automatically started by
       the host. This command is only supported for persistently-defined
       mediated devices.

VIRTUAL NETWORK COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate networks. Libvirt has the capability to
       define virtual networks which can then be used by domains and linked to
       actual network devices. For more detailed information about this feature
       see the documentation at https://libvirt.org/formatnetwork.html . Many of
       the commands for virtual networks are similar to the ones used for
       domains, but the way to name a virtual network is either by its name or
       UUID.

   net-autostart
       Syntax:

          net-autostart network [--disable]

       Configure a virtual network to be automatically started at boot.  The
       --disable option disable autostarting.

   net-create
       Syntax:

          net-create file [--validate]

       Create a transient (temporary) virtual network from an XML file and
       instantiate (start) the network.  See the documentation at
       https://libvirt.org/formatnetwork.html to get a description of the XML
       network format used by libvirt.

       Optionally, the format of the input XML file can be validated against an
       internal RNG schema with --validate.

   net-define
       Syntax:

          net-define file [--validate]

       Define an inactive persistent virtual network or modify an existing
       persistent one from the XML file.  Optionally, the format of the input
       XML file can be validated against an internal RNG schema with --validate.

   net-destroy
       Syntax:

          net-destroy network

       Destroy (stop) a given transient or persistent virtual network specified
       by its name or UUID. This takes effect immediately.

   net-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          net-dumpxml network [--inactive]

       Output the virtual network information as an XML dump to stdout.  If
       --inactive is specified, then physical functions are not expanded into
       their associated virtual functions.

   net-edit
       Syntax:

          net-edit network

       Edit the XML configuration file for a network.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh net-dumpxml --inactive network > network.xml
          vi network.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh net-define network.xml

       except that it does some error checking.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

   net-event
       Syntax:

          net-event {[network] event [--loop] [--timeout seconds] [--timestamp] | --list}

       Wait for a class of network events to occur, and print appropriate
       details of events as they happen.  The events can optionally be filtered
       by network.  Using --list as the only argument will provide a list of
       possible event values known by this client, although the connection might
       not allow registering for all these events.

       By default, this command is one-shot, and returns success once an event
       occurs; you can send SIGINT (usually via Ctrl-C) to quit immediately.  If
       --timeout is specified, the command gives up waiting for events after
       seconds have elapsed.   With --loop, the command prints all events until
       a timeout or interrupt key.

       When --timestamp is used, a human-readable timestamp will be printed
       before the event.

   net-info
       Syntax:

          net-info network

       Returns basic information about the network object.

   net-list
       Syntax:

          net-list [--inactive | --all]
             { [--table] | --name | --uuid }
             [--persistent] [<--transient>]
             [--autostart] [<--no-autostart>]

       Returns the list of active networks, if --all is specified this will also
       include defined but inactive networks, if --inactive is specified only
       the inactive ones will be listed. You may also want to filter the
       returned networks by --persistent to list the persistent ones,
       --transient to list the transient ones, --autostart to list the ones with
       autostart enabled, and --no-autostart to list the ones with autostart
       disabled.

       If --name is specified, network names are printed instead of the table
       formatted one per line. If --uuid is specified network's UUID's are
       printed instead of names. Flag --table specifies that the legacy
       table-formatted output should be used. This is the default. All of these
       are mutually exclusive.

       NOTE: When talking to older servers, this command is forced to use a
       series of API calls with an inherent race, where a pool might not be
       listed or might appear more than once if it changed state between calls
       while the list was being collected.  Newer servers do not have this
       problem.

   net-name
       Syntax:

          net-name network-UUID

       Convert a network UUID to network name.

   net-start
       Syntax:

          net-start network

       Start a (previously defined) inactive network.

   net-undefine
       Syntax:

          net-undefine network

       Undefine the configuration for a persistent network. If the network is
       active, make it transient.

   net-uuid
       Syntax:

          net-uuid network-name

       Convert a network name to network UUID.

   net-update
       Syntax:

          net-update network command section xml
             [--parent-index index] [[--live] [--config] | [--current]]

       Update the given section of an existing network definition, with the
       changes optionally taking effect immediately, without needing to destroy
       and re-start the network.

       command is one of "add-first", "add-last", "add" (a synonym for
       add-last), "delete", or "modify".

       section is one of "bridge", "domain", "ip", "ip-dhcp-host",
       "ip-dhcp-range", "forward", "forward-interface", "forward-pf",
       "portgroup", "dns-host", "dns-txt", or "dns-srv", each section being
       named by a concatenation of the xml element hierarchy leading to the
       element being changed. For example, "ip-dhcp-host" will change a <host>
       element that is contained inside a <dhcp> element inside an <ip> element
       of the network.

       xml is either the text of a complete xml element of the type being
       changed (e.g. "<host mac="00:11:22:33:44:55' ip='1.2.3.4'/>", or the name
       of a file that contains a complete xml element. Disambiguation is done by
       looking at the first character of the provided text - if the first
       character is "<", it is xml text, if the first character is not "<", it
       is the name of a file that contains the xml text to be used.

       The --parent-index option is used to specify which of several parent
       elements the requested element is in (0-based). For example, a dhcp
       <host> element could be in any one of multiple <ip> elements in the
       network; if a parent-index isn't provided, the "most appropriate" <ip>
       element will be selected (usually the only one that already has a <dhcp>
       element), but if --parent-index is given, that particular instance of
       <ip> will get the modification.

       If --live is specified, affect a running network.  If --config is
       specified, affect the next startup of a persistent network.  If --current
       is specified, it is equivalent to either --live or --config, depending on
       the current state of the guest.  Both --live and --config flags may be
       given, but --current is exclusive. Not specifying any flag is the same as
       specifying --current.

   net-dhcp-leases
       Syntax:

          net-dhcp-leases network [mac]

       Get a list of dhcp leases for all network interfaces connected to the
       given virtual network or limited output just for one interface if mac is
       specified.

NETWORK PORT COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate network ports. Libvirt virtual networks
       have ports created when a virtual machine has a virtual network interface
       added. In general there should be no need to use any of the commands
       here, since the hypervisor drivers run these commands are the right point
       in a virtual machine's lifecycle. They can be useful for debugging
       problems and / or recovering from bugs / stale state.

   net-port-list
       Syntax:

          net-port-list { [--table] | --uuid } network

       List all network ports recorded against the network.

       If --uuid is specified network ports' UUID's are printed instead of a
       table. Flag --table specifies that the legacy table-formatted output
       should be used. This is the default.  All of these are mutually
       exclusive.

   net-port-create
       Syntax:

          net-port-create network file [--validate]

       Allocate a new network port reserving resources based on the port
       description.  Optionally, the format of the input XML file can be
       validated against an internal RNG schema with --validate.

   net-port-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          net-port-dumpxml network port

       Output the network port information as an XML dump to stdout.

   net-port-delete
       Syntax:

          net-port-delete network port

       Delete record of the network port and release its resources

INTERFACE COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate host interfaces.  Often, these host
       interfaces can then be used by name within domain <interface> elements
       (such as a system-created bridge interface), but there is no requirement
       that host interfaces be tied to any particular guest configuration XML at
       all.

       Many of the commands for host interfaces are similar to the ones used for
       domains, and the way to name an interface is either by its name or its
       MAC address.  However, using a MAC address for an iface argument only
       works when that address is unique (if an interface and a bridge share the
       same MAC address, which is often the case, then using that MAC address
       results in an error due to ambiguity, and you must resort to a name
       instead).

   iface-bridge
       Syntax:

          iface-bridge interface bridge [--no-stp] [delay] [--no-start]

       Create a bridge device named bridge, and attach the existing network
       device interface to the new bridge.  The new bridge defaults to starting
       immediately, with STP enabled and a delay of 0; these settings can be
       altered with --no-stp, --no-start, and an integer number of seconds for
       delay. All IP address configuration of interface will be moved to the new
       bridge device.

       See also iface-unbridge for undoing this operation.

   iface-define
       Syntax:

          iface-define file [--validate]

       Define an inactive persistent physical host interface or modify an
       existing persistent one from the XML file. Optionally, the format of the
       input XML file can be validated against an internal RNG schema with
       --validate.

   iface-destroy
       Syntax:

          iface-destroy interface

       Destroy (stop) a given host interface, such as by running "if-down" to
       disable that interface from active use. This takes effect immediately.

   iface-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          iface-dumpxml interface [--inactive]

       Output the host interface information as an XML dump to stdout.  If
       --inactive is specified, then the output reflects the persistent state of
       the interface that will be used the next time it is started.

   iface-edit
       Syntax:

          iface-edit interface

       Edit the XML configuration file for a host interface.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh iface-dumpxml iface > iface.xml
          vi iface.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh iface-define iface.xml

       except that it does some error checking.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

   iface-list
       Syntax:

          iface-list [--inactive | --all]

       Returns the list of active host interfaces.  If --all is specified this
       will also include defined but inactive interfaces.  If --inactive is
       specified only the inactive ones will be listed.

   iface-name
       Syntax:

          iface-name interface

       Convert a host interface MAC to interface name, if the MAC address is
       unique among the host's interfaces.

       interface specifies the interface MAC address.

   iface-mac
       Syntax:

          iface-mac interface

       Convert a host interface name to MAC address.

       interface specifies the interface name.

   iface-start
       Syntax:

          iface-start interface

       Start a (previously defined) host interface, such as by running "if-up".

   iface-unbridge
       Syntax:

          iface-unbridge bridge [--no-start]

       Tear down a bridge device named bridge, releasing its underlying
       interface back to normal usage, and moving all IP address configuration
       from the bridge device to the underlying device.  The underlying
       interface is restarted unless --no-start is present; this flag is present
       for symmetry, but generally not recommended.

       See also iface-bridge for creating a bridge.

   iface-undefine
       Syntax:

          iface-undefine interface

       Undefine the configuration for an inactive host interface.

   iface-begin
       Syntax:

          iface-begin

       Create a snapshot of current host interface settings, which can later be
       committed (iface-commit) or restored (iface-rollback).  If a snapshot
       already exists, then this command will fail until the previous snapshot
       has been committed or restored.  Undefined behavior results if any
       external changes are made to host interfaces outside of the libvirt API
       between the beginning of a snapshot and its eventual commit or rollback.

   iface-commit
       Syntax:

          iface-commit

       Declare all changes since the last iface-begin as working, and delete the
       rollback point.  If no interface snapshot has already been started, then
       this command will fail.

   iface-rollback
       Syntax:

          iface-rollback

       Revert all host interface settings back to the state recorded in the last
       iface-begin.  If no interface snapshot has already been started, then
       this command will fail.  Rebooting the host also serves as an implicit
       rollback point.

STORAGE POOL COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate storage pools. Libvirt has the
       capability to manage various storage solutions, including files, raw
       partitions, and domain-specific formats, used to provide the storage
       volumes visible as devices within virtual machines. For more detailed
       information about this feature, see the documentation at
       https://libvirt.org/formatstorage.html . Many of the commands for pools
       are similar to the ones used for domains.

   find-storage-pool-sources
       Syntax:

          find-storage-pool-sources type [srcSpec]

       Returns XML describing all possible available storage pool sources that
       could be used to create or define a storage pool of a given type. If
       srcSpec is provided, it is a file that contains XML to further restrict
       the query for pools.

       Not all storage pools support discovery in this manner. Furthermore, for
       those that do support discovery, only specific XML elements are required
       in order to return valid data, while other elements and even attributes
       of some elements are ignored since they are not necessary to find the
       pool based on the search criteria. The following lists the supported type
       options and the expected minimal XML elements used to perform the search.

       For a "netfs" or "gluster" pool, the minimal expected XML required is the
       <host> element with a "name" attribute describing the IP address or
       hostname to be used to find the pool. The "port" attribute will be
       ignored as will any other provided XML elements in srcSpec.

       For a "logical" pool, the contents of the srcSpec file are ignored,
       although if provided the file must at least exist.

       For an "iscsi" or "iscsi-direct" pool, the minimal expect XML required is
       the <host> element with a "name" attribute describing the IP address or
       hostname to be used to find the pool (the iSCSI server address).
       Optionally, the "port" attribute may be provided, although it will
       default to 3260. Optionally, an <initiator> XML element with a "name"
       attribute may be provided to further restrict the iSCSI target search to
       a specific initiator for multi-iqn iSCSI storage pools.

   find-pool-sources-as
       Syntax:

          find-storage-pool-sources-as type [host] [port] [initiator]

       Rather than providing srcSpec XML file for find-storage-pool-sources use
       this command option in order to have virsh generate the query XML file
       using the optional arguments. The command will return the same output XML
       as find-storage-pool-sources.

       Use host to describe a specific host to use for networked storage, such
       as netfs, gluster, and iscsi type pools.

       Use port to further restrict which networked port to utilize for the
       connection if required by the specific storage backend, such as iscsi.

       Use initiator to further restrict the iscsi type pool searches to
       specific target initiators.

   pool-autostart
       Syntax:

          pool-autostart pool-or-uuid [--disable]

       Configure whether pool should automatically start at boot.

   pool-build
       Syntax:

          pool-build pool-or-uuid [--overwrite] [--no-overwrite]

       Build a given pool.

       Options --overwrite and --no-overwrite can only be used for pool-build a
       filesystem, disk, or logical pool.

       For a file system pool if neither flag is specified, then pool-build just
       makes the target path directory and no attempt to run mkfs on the target
       volume device. If --no-overwrite is specified, it probes to determine if
       a filesystem already exists on the target device, returning an error if
       one exists or using mkfs to format the target device if not.  If
       --overwrite is specified, mkfs is always executed and any existing data
       on the target device is overwritten unconditionally.

       For a disk pool, if neither of them is specified or --no-overwrite is
       specified, pool-build will check the target volume device for existing
       filesystems or partitions before attempting to write a new label on the
       target volume device. If the target volume device already has a label,
       the command will fail. If --overwrite is specified, then no check will be
       made on the target volume device prior to writing a new label. Writing of
       the label uses the pool source format type or "dos" if not specified.

       For a logical pool, if neither of them is specified or --no-overwrite is
       specified, pool-build will check the target volume devices for existing
       filesystems or partitions before attempting to initialize and format each
       device for usage by the logical pool. If any target volume device already
       has a label, the command will fail. If --overwrite is specified, then no
       check will be made on the target volume devices prior to initializing and
       formatting each device. Once all the target volume devices are properly
       formatted via pvcreate, the volume group will be created using all the
       devices.

   pool-create
       Syntax:

          pool-create file [--build] [[--overwrite] | [--no-overwrite]]

       Create and start a pool object from the XML file.

       [--build] [[--overwrite] | [--no-overwrite]] perform a pool-build after
       creation in order to remove the need for a follow-up command to build the
       pool. The --overwrite and --no-overwrite flags follow the same rules as
       pool-build. If just --build is provided, then pool-build is called with
       no flags.

   pool-create-as
       Syntax:

          pool-create-as name type
             [--source-host hostname] [--source-path path] [--source-dev path]
             [--source-name name] [--target path] [--source-format format]
             [--source-initiator initiator-iqn]
             [--auth-type authtype --auth-username username
             [--secret-usage usage | --secret-uuid uuid]]
             [--source-protocol-ver ver]
             [[--adapter-name name] | [--adapter-wwnn wwnn --adapter-wwpn wwpn]
             [--adapter-parent parent |
             --adapter-parent-wwnn parent_wwnn adapter-parent-wwpn parent_wwpn |
             --adapter-parent-fabric-wwn parent_fabric_wwn]]
             [--build] [[--overwrite] | [--no-overwrite]] [--print-xml]

       Create and start a pool object name from the raw parameters.  If
       --print-xml is specified, then print the XML of the pool object without
       creating the pool.  Otherwise, the pool has the specified type. When
       using pool-create-as for a pool of type "disk", the existing partitions
       found on the --source-dev path will be used to populate the disk pool.
       Therefore, it is suggested to use pool-define-as and pool-build with the
       --overwrite in order to properly initialize the disk pool.

       [--source-host hostname] provides the source hostname for pools backed by
       storage from a remote server (pool types netfs, iscsi, rbd, sheepdog,
       gluster).

       [--source-path path] provides the source directory path for pools backed
       by directories (pool type dir).

       [--source-dev path] provides the source path for pools backed by physical
       devices (pool types fs, logical, disk, iscsi, zfs).

       [--source-name name] provides the source name for pools backed by storage
       from a named element (pool types logical, rbd, sheepdog, gluster).

       [--target path] is the path for the mapping of the storage pool into the
       host file system.

       [--source-format format] provides information about the format of the
       pool (pool types fs, netfs, disk, logical).

       [--source-initiator initiator-iqn] provides the initiator iqn for iscsi
       connection of the pool (pool type iscsi-direct).

       [--auth-type authtype --auth-username username [--secret-usage usage |
       --secret-uuid uuid]] provides the elements required to generate
       authentication credentials for the storage pool. The authtype is either
       chap for iscsi type pools or ceph for rbd type pools. Either the secret
       usage or uuid value may be provided, but not both.

       [--source-protocol-ver ver] provides the NFS protocol version number used
       to contact the server's NFS service via nfs mount option 'nfsvers=n'. It
       is expect the ver value is an unsigned integer.

       [--adapter-name name] defines the scsi_hostN adapter name to be used for
       the scsi_host adapter type pool.

       [--adapter-wwnn wwnn --adapter-wwpn wwpn [--adapter-parent parent |
       --adapter-parent-wwnn parent_wwnn adapter-parent-wwpn parent_wwpn |
       --adapter-parent-fabric-wwn parent_fabric_wwn]] defines the wwnn and wwpn
       to be used for the fc_host adapter type pool.  Optionally provide the
       parent scsi_hostN node device to be used for the vHBA either by parent
       name, parent_wwnn and parent_wwpn, or parent_fabric_wwn.  The parent name
       could change between reboots if the hardware environment changes, so
       providing the parent_wwnn and parent_wwpn ensure usage of the same
       physical HBA even if the scsi_hostN node device changes. Usage of the
       parent_fabric_wwn allows a bit more flexibility to choose an HBA on the
       same storage fabric in order to define the pool.

       [--build] [[--overwrite] | [--no-overwrite]] perform a pool-build after
       creation in order to remove the need for a follow-up command to build the
       pool. The --overwrite and --no-overwrite flags follow the same rules as
       pool-build. If just --build is provided, then pool-build is called with
       no flags.

       For a "logical" pool only [--name] needs to be provided. The
       [--source-name] if provided must match the Volume Group name.  If not
       provided, one will be generated using the [--name]. If provided the
       [--target] is ignored and a target source is generated using the
       [--source-name] (or as generated from the [--name]).

   pool-define
       Syntax:

          pool-define file [--validate]

       Define an inactive persistent storage pool or modify an existing
       persistent one from the XML file.  Optionally, the format of the input
       XML file can be validated against an internal RNG schema with --validate.

   pool-define-as
       Syntax:

          pool-define-as name type
             [--source-host hostname] [--source-path path] [--source-dev path]
             [*--source-name name*] [*--target path*] [*--source-format format*]
             [--source-initiator initiator-iqn]
             [*--auth-type authtype* *--auth-username username*
             [*--secret-usage usage* | *--secret-uuid uuid*]]
             [*--source-protocol-ver ver*]
             [[*--adapter-name name*] | [*--adapter-wwnn* *--adapter-wwpn*]
             [*--adapter-parent parent*]] [*--print-xml*]

       Create, but do not start, a pool object name from the raw parameters.  If
       --print-xml is specified, then print the XML of the pool object without
       defining the pool.  Otherwise, the pool has the specified type.

       Use the same arguments as pool-create-as, except for the --build,
       --overwrite, and --no-overwrite options.

   pool-destroy
       Syntax:

          pool-destroy pool-or-uuid

       Destroy (stop) a given pool object. Libvirt will no longer manage the
       storage described by the pool object, but the raw data contained in the
       pool is not changed, and can be later recovered with pool-create.

   pool-delete
       Syntax:

          pool-delete pool-or-uuid

       Destroy the resources used by a given pool object. This operation is
       non-recoverable.  The pool object will still exist after this command,
       ready for the creation of new storage volumes.

   pool-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          pool-dumpxml [--inactive] pool-or-uuid

       Returns the XML information about the pool object.  --inactive tells
       virsh to dump pool configuration that will be used on next start of the
       pool as opposed to the current pool configuration.

   pool-edit
       Syntax:

          pool-edit pool-or-uuid

       Edit the XML configuration file for a storage pool.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh pool-dumpxml pool > pool.xml
          vi pool.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh pool-define pool.xml

       except that it does some error checking.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

   pool-info
       Syntax:

          pool-info [--bytes] pool-or-uuid

       Returns basic information about the pool object. If --bytes is specified
       the sizes of basic info are not converted to human friendly units.

   pool-list
       Syntax:

          pool-list [--inactive] [--all]
             [--persistent] [--transient]
             [--autostart] [--no-autostart]
             [[--details] [--uuid]
             [--name] [<type>]

       List pool objects known to libvirt.  By default, only active pools are
       listed; --inactive lists just the inactive pools, and --all lists all
       pools.

       In addition, there are several sets of filtering flags. --persistent is
       to list the persistent pools, --transient is to list the transient pools.
       --autostart lists the autostarting pools, --no-autostart lists the pools
       with autostarting disabled. If --uuid is specified only pool's UUIDs are
       printed.  If --name is specified only pool's names are printed. If both
       --name and --uuid are specified, pool's UUID and names are printed side
       by side without any header. Option --details is mutually exclusive with
       options --uuid and --name.

       You may also want to list pools with specified types using type, the pool
       types must be separated by comma, e.g. --type dir,disk. The valid pool
       types include 'dir', 'fs', 'netfs', 'logical', 'disk', 'iscsi', 'scsi',
       'mpath', 'rbd', 'sheepdog', 'gluster', 'zfs', 'vstorage' and
       'iscsi-direct'.

       The --details option instructs virsh to additionally display pool
       persistence and capacity related information where available.

       NOTE: When talking to older servers, this command is forced to use a
       series of API calls with an inherent race, where a pool might not be
       listed or might appear more than once if it changed state between calls
       while the list was being collected.  Newer servers do not have this
       problem.

   pool-name
       Syntax:

          pool-name uuid

       Convert the uuid to a pool name.

   pool-refresh
       Syntax:

          pool-refresh pool-or-uuid

       Refresh the list of volumes contained in pool.

   pool-start
       Syntax:

          pool-start pool-or-uuid [--build] [[--overwrite] | [--no-overwrite]]

       Start the storage pool, which is previously defined but inactive.

       [--build] [[--overwrite] | [--no-overwrite]] perform a pool-build prior
       to pool-start to ensure the pool environment is in an expected state
       rather than needing to run the build command prior to startup. The
       --overwrite and --no-overwrite flags follow the same rules as pool-build.
       If just --build is provided, then pool-build is called with no flags.

       Note: A storage pool that relies on remote resources such as an "iscsi"
       or a (v)HBA backed "scsi" pool may need to be refreshed multiple times in
       order to have all the volumes detected (see pool-refresh).  This is
       because the corresponding volume devices may not be present in the host's
       filesystem during the initial pool startup or the current refresh
       attempt. The number of refresh retries is dependent upon the network
       connection and the time the host takes to export the corresponding
       devices.

   pool-undefine
       Syntax:

          pool-undefine pool-or-uuid

       Undefine the configuration for an inactive pool.

   pool-uuid
       Syntax:

          pool-uuid pool

       Returns the UUID of the named pool.

   pool-event
       Syntax:

          pool-event {[pool] event [--loop] [--timeout seconds] [--timestamp] | --list}

       Wait for a class of storage pool events to occur, and print appropriate
       details of events as they happen.  The events can optionally be filtered
       by pool.  Using --list as the only argument will provide a list of
       possible event values known by this client, although the connection might
       not allow registering for all these events.

       By default, this command is one-shot, and returns success once an event
       occurs; you can send SIGINT (usually via Ctrl-C) to quit immediately.  If
       --timeout is specified, the command gives up waiting for events after
       seconds have elapsed.   With --loop, the command prints all events until
       a timeout or interrupt key.

       When --timestamp is used, a human-readable timestamp will be printed
       before the event.

VOLUME COMMANDS
   vol-create
       Syntax:

          vol-create pool-or-uuid FILE [--prealloc-metadata]

       Create a volume from an XML <file>.

       pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool to create the volume
       in.

       FILE is the XML <file> with the volume definition. An easy way to create
       the XML <file> is to use the vol-dumpxml command to obtain the definition
       of a pre-existing volume.

       [--prealloc-metadata] preallocate metadata (for qcow2 images which don't
       support full allocation). This option creates a sparse image file with
       metadata, resulting in higher performance compared to images with no
       preallocation and only slightly higher initial disk space usage.

       Example:

          virsh vol-dumpxml --pool storagepool1 appvolume1 > newvolume.xml
          vi newvolume.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh vol-create differentstoragepool newvolume.xml

   vol-create-from
       Syntax:

          vol-create-from pool-or-uuid FILE vol-name-or-key-or-path
             [--inputpool pool-or-uuid]  [--prealloc-metadata] [--reflink]

       Create a volume, using another volume as input.

       pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool to create the volume
       in.

       FILE is the XML <file> with the volume definition.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the name or key or path of the source volume.

       --inputpool pool-or-uuid is the name or uuid of the storage pool the
       source volume is in.

       [--prealloc-metadata] preallocate metadata (for qcow2 images which don't
       support full allocation). This option creates a sparse image file with
       metadata, resulting in higher performance compared to images with no
       preallocation and only slightly higher initial disk space usage.

       When --reflink is specified, perform a COW lightweight copy, where the
       data blocks are copied only when modified.  If this is not possible, the
       copy fails.

   vol-create-as
       Syntax:

          vol-create-as pool-or-uuid name capacity [--allocation size] [--format string]
             [--backing-vol vol-name-or-key-or-path]
             [--backing-vol-format string] [--prealloc-metadata] [--print-xml]

       Create a volume from a set of arguments unless --print-xml is specified,
       in which case just the XML of the volume object is printed out without
       any actual object creation.

       pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool to create the volume
       in.

       name is the name of the new volume. For a disk pool, this must match the
       partition name as determined from the pool's source device path and the
       next available partition. For example, a source device path of /dev/sdb
       and there are no partitions on the disk, then the name must be sdb1 with
       the next name being sdb2 and so on.

       capacity is the size of the volume to be created, as a scaled integer
       (see NOTES above), defaulting to bytes if there is no suffix.

       --allocation size is the initial size to be allocated in the volume, also
       as a scaled integer defaulting to bytes.

       --format string is used in file based storage pools to specify the volume
       file format to use; raw, bochs, qcow, qcow2, vmdk, qed. Use extended for
       disk storage pools in order to create an extended partition (other values
       are validity checked but not preserved when libvirtd is restarted or the
       pool is refreshed).

       --backing-vol vol-name-or-key-or-path is the source backing volume to be
       used if taking a snapshot of an existing volume.

       --backing-vol-format string is the format of the snapshot backing volume;
       raw, bochs, qcow, qcow2, qed, vmdk, host_device. These are, however,
       meant for file based storage pools.

       [--prealloc-metadata] preallocate metadata (for qcow2 images which don't
       support full allocation). This option creates a sparse image file with
       metadata, resulting in higher performance compared to images with no
       preallocation and only slightly higher initial disk space usage.

   vol-clone
       Syntax:

          vol-clone vol-name-or-key-or-path name
             [--pool pool-or-uuid] [--prealloc-metadata] [--reflink]

       Clone an existing volume within the parent pool.  Less powerful, but
       easier to type, version of vol-create-from.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the name or key or path of the source volume.

       name is the name of the new volume.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool that contains
       the source volume and will contain the new volume.  If the source volume
       name is provided instead of the key or path, then providing the pool is
       necessary to find the volume to be cloned; otherwise, the first volume
       found by the key or path will be used.

       [--prealloc-metadata] preallocate metadata (for qcow2 images which don't
       support full allocation). This option creates a sparse image file with
       metadata, resulting in higher performance compared to images with no
       preallocation and only slightly higher initial disk space usage.

       When --reflink is specified, perform a COW lightweight copy, where the
       data blocks are copied only when modified.  If this is not possible, the
       copy fails.

   vol-delete
       Syntax:

          vol-delete vol-name-or-key-or-path [--pool pool-or-uuid] [--delete-snapshots]

       Delete a given volume.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the volume name or key or path of the volume
       to delete.

       [--pool pool-or-uuid] is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume
       is in. If the volume name is provided instead of the key or path, then
       providing the pool is necessary to find the volume to be deleted;
       otherwise, the first volume found by the key or path will be used.

       The --delete-snapshots flag specifies that any snapshots associated with
       the storage volume should be deleted as well. Not all storage drivers
       support this option, presently only rbd.

   vol-upload
       Syntax:

          vol-upload vol-name-or-key-or-path local-file
             [--pool pool-or-uuid] [--offset bytes]
             [--length bytes] [--sparse]

       Upload the contents of local-file to a storage volume.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the name or key or path of the volume where
       the local-file will be uploaded.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume is
       in. If the volume name is provided instead of the key or path, then
       providing the pool is necessary to find the volume to be uploaded into;
       otherwise, the first volume found by the key or path will be used.

       --offset is the position in the storage volume at which to start writing
       the data. The value must be 0 or larger.

       --length is an upper bound of the amount of data to be uploaded.  A
       negative value is interpreted as an unsigned long long value to
       essentially include everything from the offset to the end of the volume.

       If --sparse is specified, this command will preserve volume sparseness.

       An error will occur if the local-file is greater than the specified
       length.

       See the description for the libvirt virStorageVolUpload API for details
       regarding possible target volume and pool changes as a result of the pool
       refresh when the upload is attempted.

   vol-download
       Syntax:

          vol-download vol-name-or-key-or-path local-file
             [--pool pool-or-uuid] [--offset bytes] [--length bytes]
             [--sparse]

       Download the contents of a storage volume to local-file.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the name or key or path of the volume to
       download into local-file.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume is
       in. If the volume name is provided instead of the key or path, then
       providing the pool is necessary to find the volume to be uploaded into;
       otherwise, the first volume found by the key or path will be used.

       --offset is the position in the storage volume at which to start reading
       the data. The value must be 0 or larger.

       --length is an upper bound of the amount of data to be downloaded.  A
       negative value is interpreted as an unsigned long long value to
       essentially include everything from the offset to the end of the volume.

       If --sparse is specified, this command will preserve volume sparseness.

   vol-wipe
       Syntax:

          vol-wipe vol-name-or-key-or-path [--pool pool-or-uuid] [--algorithm algorithm]

       Wipe a volume, ensure data previously on the volume is not accessible to
       future reads.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the name or key or path of the volume to wipe.
       It is possible to choose different wiping algorithms instead of
       re-writing volume with zeroes.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume is
       in. If the volume name is provided instead of the key or path, then
       providing the pool is necessary to find the volume to be wiped;
       otherwise, the first volume found by the key or path will be used.

       Use the --algorithm switch choosing from the list of the following
       algorithms in order to define which algorithm to use for the wipe.

       Supported algorithms

       • zero       - 1-pass all zeroes

       • nnsa       - 4-pass NNSA Policy Letter NAP-14.1-C (XVI-8) for
         sanitizing removable and non-removable hard disks: random x2, 0x00,
         verify.

       • dod        - 4-pass DoD 5220.22-M section 8-306 procedure for
         sanitizing removable and non-removable rigid disks: random, 0x00, 0xff,
         verify.

       • bsi        - 9-pass method recommended by the German Center of Security
         in Information Technologies (https://www.bsi.bund.de): 0xff, 0xfe,
         0xfd, 0xfb, 0xf7, 0xef, 0xdf, 0xbf, 0x7f.

       • gutmann    - The canonical 35-pass sequence described in Gutmann's
         paper.

       • schneier   - 7-pass method described by Bruce Schneier in "Applied
         Cryptography" (1996): 0x00, 0xff, random x5.

       • pfitzner7  - Roy Pfitzner's 7-random-pass method: random x7.

       • pfitzner33 - Roy Pfitzner's 33-random-pass method: random x33.

       • random     - 1-pass pattern: random.

       • trim       - 1-pass trimming the volume using TRIM or DISCARD

       Note: The scrub binary will be used to handle the 'nnsa', 'dod', 'bsi',
       'gutmann', 'schneier', 'pfitzner7' and 'pfitzner33' algorithms.  The
       availability of the algorithms may be limited by the version of the scrub
       binary installed on the host. The 'zero' algorithm will write zeroes to
       the entire volume. For some volumes, such as sparse or rbd volumes, this
       may result in completely filling the volume with zeroes making it appear
       to be completely full. As an alternative, the 'trim' algorithm does not
       overwrite all the data in a volume, rather it expects the storage driver
       to be able to discard all bytes in a volume. It is up to the storage
       driver to handle how the discarding occurs. Not all storage drivers or
       volume types can support 'trim'.

   vol-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          vol-dumpxml vol-name-or-key-or-path [--pool pool-or-uuid]

       Output the volume information as an XML dump to stdout.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the name or key or path of the volume to
       output the XML.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume is
       in. If the volume name is provided instead of the key or path, then
       providing the pool is necessary to find the volume to be uploaded into;
       otherwise, the first volume found by the key or path will be used.

   vol-info
       Syntax:

          vol-info vol-name-or-key-or-path [--pool pool-or-uuid] [--bytes] [--physical]

       Returns basic information about the given storage volume.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the name or key or path of the volume to
       return information for.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume is
       in. If the volume name is provided instead of the key or path, then
       providing the pool is necessary to find the volume to be uploaded into;
       otherwise, the first volume found by the key or path will be used.

       If --bytes is specified the sizes are not converted to human friendly
       units.

       If --physical is specified, then the host physical size is returned and
       displayed instead of the allocation value. The physical value for some
       file types, such as qcow2 may have a different (larger) physical value
       than is shown for allocation. Additionally sparse files will have
       different physical and allocation values.

   vol-list
       Syntax:

          vol-list [--pool pool-or-uuid] [--details]

       Return the list of volumes in the given storage pool.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool.

       The --details option instructs virsh to additionally display volume type
       and capacity related information where available.

   vol-pool
       Syntax:

          vol-pool vol-key-or-path [--uuid]

       Return the pool name or UUID for a given volume. By default, the pool
       name is returned.

       vol-key-or-path is the key or path of the volume to return the pool
       information.

       If the --uuid option is given, the pool UUID is returned instead.

   vol-path
       Syntax:

          vol-path vol-name-or-key [--pool pool-or-uuid]

       Return the path for a given volume.

       vol-name-or-key is the name or key of the volume to return the path.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume is
       in. If the volume name is provided instead of the key, then providing the
       pool is necessary to find the volume to be uploaded into; otherwise, the
       first volume found by the key will be used.

   vol-name
       Syntax:

          vol-name vol-key-or-path

       Return the name for a given volume.

       vol-key-or-path is the key or path of the volume to return the name.

   vol-key
       Syntax:

          vol-key vol-name-or-path [--pool pool-or-uuid]

       Return the volume key for a given volume.

       vol-name-or-path is the name or path of the volume to return the volume
       key.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume is
       in. If the volume name is provided instead of the path, then providing
       the pool is necessary to find the volume to be uploaded into; otherwise,
       the first volume found by the path will be used.

   vol-resize
       Syntax:

          vol-resize vol-name-or-path capacity [--pool pool-or-uuid] [--allocate] [--delta] [--shrink]

       Resize the capacity of the given volume, in bytes.

       vol-name-or-key-or-path is the name or key or path of the volume to
       resize.

       capacity is a scaled integer (see NOTES above) for the volume, which
       defaults to bytes if there is no suffix.

       --pool pool-or-uuid is the name or UUID of the storage pool the volume is
       in. If the volume name is provided instead of the key or path, then
       providing the pool is necessary to find the volume to be uploaded into;
       otherwise, the first volume found by the key or path will be used.

       The new capacity might be sparse unless --allocate is specified.

       Normally, capacity is the new size, but if --delta is present, then it is
       added to the existing size.

       Attempts to shrink the volume will fail unless --shrink is present.  The
       capacity cannot be negative unless --shrink is provided, but a negative
       sign is not necessary.

       This command is only safe for storage volumes not in use by an active
       guest; see also blockresize for live resizing.

SECRET COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate "secrets" (e.g. passwords, passphrases
       and encryption keys).  Libvirt can store secrets independently from their
       use, and other objects (e.g. volumes or domains) can refer to the secrets
       for encryption or possibly other uses.  Secrets are identified using a
       UUID.  See https://libvirt.org/formatsecret.html for documentation of the
       XML format used to represent properties of secrets.

   secret-define
       Syntax:

          secret-define file [--validate]

       Create a secret with the properties specified in file, with no associated
       secret value.  If file does not specify a UUID, choose one automatically.
       If file specifies a UUID of an existing secret, replace its properties by
       properties defined in file, without affecting the secret value.

       Optionally, the format of the input XML file can be validated against an
       internal RNG schema with --validate.

   secret-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          secret-dumpxml secret

       Output properties of secret (specified by its UUID) as an XML dump to
       stdout.

   secret-event
       Syntax:

          secret-event {[secret] event [--loop] [--timeout seconds] [--timestamp] | --list}

       Wait for a class of secret events to occur, and print appropriate details
       of events as they happen.  The events can optionally be filtered by
       secret.  Using --list as the only argument will provide a list of
       possible event values known by this client, although the connection might
       not allow registering for all these events.

       By default, this command is one-shot, and returns success once an event
       occurs; you can send SIGINT (usually via Ctrl-C) to quit immediately.  If
       --timeout is specified, the command gives up waiting for events after
       seconds have elapsed.   With --loop, the command prints all events until
       a timeout or interrupt key.

       When --timestamp is used, a human-readable timestamp will be printed
       before the event.

   secret-set-value
       Syntax:

          secret-set-value secret (--file filename [--plain] | --interactive | base64)

       Set the value associated with secret (specified by its UUID) to the value
       Base64-encoded value base64 or Base-64-encoded contents of file named
       filename. Using the --plain flag is together with --file allows one to
       use the file contents directly as the secret value.

       If --interactive flag is used the secret value is read as a password from
       the terminal.

       Note that --file, --interactive and base64 options are mutually
       exclusive.

       Passing secrets via the base64 option on command line is INSECURE and
       deprecated. Use the --file option instead.

   secret-get-value
       Syntax:

          secret-get-value [--plain] secret

       Output the value associated with secret (specified by its UUID) to
       stdout, encoded using Base64.

       If the --plain flag is used the value is not base64 encoded, but rather
       printed raw. Note that unless virsh is started in quiet mode (virsh -q)
       it prints a newline at the end of the command. This newline is not part
       of the secret.

   secret-undefine
       Syntax:

          secret-undefine secret

       Delete a secret (specified by its UUID), including the associated value,
       if any.

   secret-list
       Syntax:

          secret-list [--ephemeral] [--no-ephemeral]
             [--private] [--no-private]

       Returns the list of secrets. You may also want to filter the returned
       secrets by --ephemeral to list the ephemeral ones, --no-ephemeral to list
       the non-ephemeral ones, --private to list the private ones, and
       --no-private to list the non-private ones.

SNAPSHOT COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate domain snapshots.  Snapshots take the
       disk, memory, and device state of a domain at a point-of-time, and save
       it for future use.  They have many uses, from saving a "clean" copy of an
       OS image to saving a domain's state before a potentially destructive
       operation.  Snapshots are identified with a unique name.  See
       https://libvirt.org/formatsnapshot.html for documentation of the XML
       format used to represent properties of snapshots.

   snapshot-create
       Syntax:

          snapshot-create domain [xmlfile] {[--redefine [--current]] |
             [--no-metadata] [--halt] [--disk-only] [--reuse-external]
             [--quiesce] [--atomic] [--live]} [--validate]

       Create a snapshot for domain domain with the properties specified in
       xmlfile.   Optionally, the --validate option can be passed to validate
       the format of the input XML file against an internal RNG schema
       (identical to using the virt-xml-validate(1) tool). Normally, the only
       properties settable for a domain snapshot are the <name> and
       <description> elements, as well as <disks> if --disk-only is given; the
       rest of the fields are ignored, and automatically filled in by libvirt.
       If xmlfile is completely omitted, then libvirt will choose a value for
       all fields.  The new snapshot will become current, as listed by
       snapshot-current.

       If --halt is specified, the domain will be left in an inactive state
       after the snapshot is created.

       If --disk-only is specified, the snapshot will only include disk content
       rather than the usual full system snapshot with vm state.  Disk snapshots
       are captured faster than full system snapshots, but reverting to a disk
       snapshot may require fsck or journal replays, since it is like the disk
       state at the point when the power cord is abruptly pulled; and mixing
       --halt and --disk-only loses any data that was not flushed to disk at the
       time.

       If --redefine is specified, then all XML elements produced by
       snapshot-dumpxml are valid; this can be used to migrate snapshot
       hierarchy from one machine to another, to recreate hierarchy for the case
       of a transient domain that goes away and is later recreated with the same
       name and UUID, or to make slight alterations in the snapshot metadata
       (such as host-specific aspects of the domain XML embedded in the
       snapshot).  When this flag is supplied, the xmlfile argument is
       mandatory, and the domain's current snapshot will not be altered unless
       the --current flag is also given.

       If --no-metadata is specified, then the snapshot data is created, but any
       metadata is immediately discarded (that is, libvirt does not treat the
       snapshot as current, and cannot revert to the snapshot unless --redefine
       is later used to teach libvirt about the metadata again).

       If --reuse-external is specified, and the snapshot XML requests an
       external snapshot with a destination of an existing file, then the
       destination must exist and be pre-created with correct format and
       metadata. The file is then reused; otherwise, a snapshot is refused to
       avoid losing contents of the existing files.

       If --quiesce is specified, libvirt will try to use guest agent to freeze
       and unfreeze domain's mounted file systems. However, if domain has no
       guest agent, snapshot creation will fail.  Currently, this requires
       --disk-only to be passed as well.

       If --atomic is specified, libvirt will guarantee that the snapshot either
       succeeds, or fails with no changes; not all hypervisors support this.  If
       this flag is not specified, then some hypervisors may fail after
       partially performing the action, and dumpxml must be used to see whether
       any partial changes occurred.

       If --live is specified, libvirt takes the snapshot while the guest is
       running. Both disk snapshot and domain memory snapshot are taken. This
       increases the size of the memory image of the external snapshot. This is
       currently supported only for full system external snapshots.

       Existence of snapshot metadata will prevent attempts to undefine a
       persistent guest.  However, for transient domains, snapshot metadata is
       silently lost when the domain quits running (whether by command such as
       destroy or by internal guest action).

       For now, it is not possible to create snapshots in a domain that has
       checkpoints, although this restriction will be lifted in a future
       release.

   snapshot-create-as
       Syntax:

          snapshot-create-as domain {[--print-xml] [--no-metadata]
             [--halt] [--reuse-external]} [name]
             [description] [--disk-only [--quiesce]] [--atomic] [--validate]
             [[--live] [--memspec memspec]] [--diskspec] diskspec]...

       Create a snapshot for domain domain with the given <name> and
       <description>; if either value is omitted, libvirt will choose a value.
       If --print-xml is specified, then XML appropriate for snapshot-create is
       output, rather than actually creating a snapshot.  Otherwise, if --halt
       is specified, the domain will be left in an inactive state after the
       snapshot is created, and if --disk-only is specified, the snapshot will
       not include vm state.

       The --memspec option can be used to control whether a full system
       snapshot is internal or external.  The --memspec flag is mandatory,
       followed by a memspec of the form [file=]name[,snapshot=type], where type
       can be no, internal, or external.  To include a literal comma in
       file=name, escape it with a second comma. --memspec cannot be used
       together with --disk-only.

       The --diskspec option can be used to control how --disk-only and external
       full system snapshots create external files.  This option can occur
       multiple times, according to the number of <disk> elements in the domain
       xml.  Each <diskspec> is in the form
       disk[,snapshot=type][,driver=type][,stype=type][,file=name].  A diskspec
       must be provided for disks backed by block devices as libvirt doesn't
       auto-generate file names for those.  The optional stype parameter allows
       one to control the type of the source file. Supported values are 'file'
       (default) and 'block'. To exclude a disk from an external snapshot use
       --diskspec disk,snapshot=no.

       To include a literal comma in disk or in file=name, escape it with a
       second comma.  A literal --diskspec must precede each diskspec unless all
       three of domain, name, and description are also present.  For example, a
       diskspec of "vda,snapshot=external,file=/path/to,,new" results in the
       following XML:

          <disk name='vda' snapshot='external'>
            <source file='/path/to,new'/>
          </disk>

       If --reuse-external is specified, and the domain XML or diskspec option
       requests an external snapshot with a destination of an existing file,
       then the destination must exist and be pre-created with correct format
       and metadata. The file is then reused; otherwise, a snapshot is refused
       to avoid losing contents of the existing files.

       If --quiesce is specified, libvirt will try to use guest agent to freeze
       and unfreeze domain's mounted file systems. However, if domain has no
       guest agent, snapshot creation will fail.  Currently, this requires
       --disk-only to be passed as well.

       If --no-metadata is specified, then the snapshot data is created, but any
       metadata is immediately discarded (that is, libvirt does not treat the
       snapshot as current, and cannot revert to the snapshot unless
       snapshot-create is later used to teach libvirt about the metadata again).

       If --atomic is specified, libvirt will guarantee that the snapshot either
       succeeds, or fails with no changes; not all hypervisors support this.  If
       this flag is not specified, then some hypervisors may fail after
       partially performing the action, and dumpxml must be used to see whether
       any partial changes occurred.

       If --live is specified, libvirt takes the snapshot while the guest is
       running. This increases the size of the memory image of the external
       snapshot. This is currently supported only for external full system
       snapshots.

       For now, it is not possible to create snapshots in a domain that has
       checkpoints, although this restriction will be lifted in a future
       release.

       Optionally, the --validate option can be passed to validate XML document
       which is internally generated by this command against the internal RNG
       schema.

   snapshot-current
       Syntax:

          snapshot-current domain {[--name] | [--security-info] | [snapshotname]}

       Without snapshotname, this will output the snapshot XML for the domain's
       current snapshot (if any).  If --name is specified, just the current
       snapshot name instead of the full xml.  Otherwise, using --security-info
       will also include security sensitive information in the XML.

       With snapshotname, this is a request to make the existing named snapshot
       become the current snapshot, without reverting the domain.

   snapshot-edit
       Syntax:

          snapshot-edit domain [snapshotname] [--current] {[--rename] | [--clone]}

       Edit the XML configuration file for snapshotname of a domain.  If both
       snapshotname and --current are specified, also force the edited snapshot
       to become the current snapshot.  If snapshotname is omitted, then
       --current must be supplied, to edit the current snapshot.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh snapshot-dumpxml dom name > snapshot.xml
          vi snapshot.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh snapshot-create dom snapshot.xml --redefine [--current]

       except that it does some error checking.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

       If --rename is specified, then the edits can change the snapshot name.
       If --clone is specified, then changing the snapshot name will create a
       clone of the snapshot metadata.  If neither is specified, then the edits
       must not change the snapshot name.  Note that changing a snapshot name
       must be done with care, since the contents of some snapshots, such as
       internal snapshots within a single qcow2 file, are accessible only from
       the original name.

   snapshot-info
       Syntax:

          snapshot-info domain {snapshot | --current}

       Output basic information about a named <snapshot>, or the current
       snapshot with --current.

   snapshot-list
       Syntax:

          snapshot-list domain [--metadata] [--no-metadata]
             [{--parent | --roots | [{--tree | --name}]}] [--topological]
             [{[--from] snapshot | --current} [--descendants]]
             [--leaves] [--no-leaves] [--inactive] [--active]
             [--disk-only] [--internal] [--external]

       List all of the available snapshots for the given domain, defaulting to
       show columns for the snapshot name, creation time, and domain state.

       Normally, table form output is sorted by snapshot name; using
       --topological instead sorts so that no child is listed before its
       ancestors (although there may be more than one possible ordering with
       this property).

       If --parent is specified, add a column to the output table giving the
       name of the parent of each snapshot.  If --roots is specified, the list
       will be filtered to just snapshots that have no parents.  If --tree is
       specified, the output will be in a tree format, listing just snapshot
       names.  These three options are mutually exclusive. If --name is
       specified only the snapshot name is printed. This option is mutually
       exclusive with --tree.

       If --from is provided, filter the list to snapshots which are children of
       the given snapshot; or if --current is provided, start at the current
       snapshot.  When used in isolation or with --parent, the list is limited
       to direct children unless --descendants is also present.  When used with
       --tree, the use of --descendants is implied.  This option is not
       compatible with --roots.  Note that the starting point of --from or
       --current is not included in the list unless the --tree option is also
       present.

       If --leaves is specified, the list will be filtered to just snapshots
       that have no children.  Likewise, if --no-leaves is specified, the list
       will be filtered to just snapshots with children.  (Note that omitting
       both options does no filtering, while providing both options will either
       produce the same list or error out depending on whether the server
       recognizes the flags).  Filtering options are not compatible with --tree.

       If --metadata is specified, the list will be filtered to just snapshots
       that involve libvirt metadata, and thus would prevent undefine of a
       persistent guest, or be lost on destroy of a transient domain.  Likewise,
       if --no-metadata is specified, the list will be filtered to just
       snapshots that exist without the need for libvirt metadata.

       If --inactive is specified, the list will be filtered to snapshots that
       were taken when the domain was shut off.  If --active is specified, the
       list will be filtered to snapshots that were taken when the domain was
       running, and where the snapshot includes the memory state to revert to
       that running state.  If --disk-only is specified, the list will be
       filtered to snapshots that were taken when the domain was running, but
       where the snapshot includes only disk state.

       If --internal is specified, the list will be filtered to snapshots that
       use internal storage of existing disk images.  If --external is
       specified, the list will be filtered to snapshots that use external files
       for disk images or memory state.

   snapshot-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          snapshot-dumpxml domain snapshot [--security-info]

       Output the snapshot XML for the domain's snapshot named snapshot.  Using
       --security-info will also include security sensitive information.  Use
       snapshot-current to easily access the XML of the current snapshot.

   snapshot-parent
       Syntax:

          snapshot-parent domain {snapshot | --current}

       Output the name of the parent snapshot, if any, for the given snapshot,
       or for the current snapshot with --current.

   snapshot-revert
       Syntax:

          snapshot-revert domain {snapshot | --current} [{--running | --paused}] [--force]

       Revert the given domain to the snapshot specified by snapshot, or to the
       current snapshot with --current.  Be aware that this is a destructive
       action; any changes in the domain since the last snapshot was taken will
       be lost.  Also note that the state of the domain after snapshot-revert is
       complete will be the state of the domain at the time the original
       snapshot was taken.

       Normally, reverting to a snapshot leaves the domain in the state it was
       at the time the snapshot was created, except that a disk snapshot with no
       vm state leaves the domain in an inactive state.  Passing either the
       --running or --paused flag will perform additional state changes (such as
       booting an inactive domain, or pausing a running domain).  Since
       transient domains cannot be inactive, it is required to use one of these
       flags when reverting to a disk snapshot of a transient domain.

       There are a number of cases where a snapshot revert involves extra risk,
       which requires the use of --force to proceed:

          • One is the case of a snapshot that lacks full domain information for
            reverting configuration (such as snapshots created prior to libvirt
            0.9.5); since libvirt cannot prove that the current configuration
            matches what was in use at the time of the snapshot, supplying
            --force assures libvirt that the snapshot is compatible with the
            current configuration (and if it is not, the domain will likely fail
            to run).

          • Another is the case of reverting from a running domain to an active
            state where a new hypervisor has to be created rather than reusing
            the existing hypervisor, because it implies drawbacks such as
            breaking any existing VNC or Spice connections; this condition
            happens with an active snapshot that uses a provably incompatible
            configuration, as well as with an inactive snapshot that is combined
            with the --start or --pause flag.

          • Also, libvirt will refuse to restore snapshots of inactive QEMU
            domains while there is managed saved state. This is because those
            snapshots do not contain memory state and will therefore not replace
            the existing memory state. This ends up switching a disk underneath
            a running system and will likely cause extensive filesystem
            corruption or crashes due to swap content mismatches when run.

   snapshot-delete
       Syntax:

          snapshot-delete domain {snapshot | --current}
             [--metadata] [{--children | --children-only}]

       Delete the snapshot for the domain named snapshot, or the current
       snapshot with --current.  If this snapshot has child snapshots, changes
       from this snapshot will be merged into the children.  If --children is
       passed, then delete this snapshot and any children of this snapshot.  If
       --children-only is passed, then delete any children of this snapshot, but
       leave this snapshot intact.  These two flags are mutually exclusive.

       If --metadata is specified, then only delete the snapshot metadata
       maintained by libvirt, while leaving the snapshot contents intact for
       access by external tools; otherwise deleting a snapshot also removes the
       data contents from that point in time.

CHECKPOINT COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate domain checkpoints.  Checkpoints serve
       as a point in time to identify which portions of a guest's disks have
       changed after that time, making it possible to perform incremental and
       differential backups.  Checkpoints are identified with a unique name.
       See https://libvirt.org/formatcheckpoint.html for documentation of the
       XML format used to represent properties of checkpoints.

   checkpoint-create
       Syntax:

          checkpoint-create domain [xmlfile] { --redefine [--redefine-validate] | [--quiesce]}

       Create a checkpoint for domain domain with the properties specified in
       xmlfile describing a <domaincheckpoint> top-level element. The format of
       the input XML file will be validated against an internal RNG schema
       (identical to using the virt-xml-validate(1) tool). If xmlfile is
       completely omitted, then libvirt will create a checkpoint with a name
       based on the current time.

       If --redefine is specified, then all XML elements produced by
       checkpoint-dumpxml are valid; this can be used to migrate checkpoint
       hierarchy from one machine to another, to recreate hierarchy for the case
       of a transient domain that goes away and is later recreated with the same
       name and UUID, or to make slight alterations in the checkpoint metadata
       (such as host-specific aspects of the domain XML embedded in the
       checkpoint).  When this flag is supplied, the xmlfile argument is
       mandatory.

       If --redefine-validate is specified along with --redefine the hypervisor
       performs validation of metadata associated with the checkpoint stored in
       places besides the checkpoint XML. Note that some hypervisors may require
       that the domain is running to perform validation.

       If --quiesce is specified, libvirt will try to use guest agent to freeze
       and unfreeze domain's mounted file systems. However, if domain has no
       guest agent, checkpoint creation will fail.

       Existence of checkpoint metadata will prevent attempts to undefine a
       persistent guest.  However, for transient domains, checkpoint metadata is
       silently lost when the domain quits running (whether by command such as
       destroy or by internal guest action).

       For now, it is not possible to create checkpoints in a domain that has
       snapshots, although this restriction will be lifted in a future release.

   checkpoint-create-as
       Syntax:

          checkpoint-create-as domain [--print-xml] [name]
             [description] [--quiesce] [--diskspec] diskspec]...

       Create a checkpoint for domain domain with the given <name> and
       <description>; if either value is omitted, libvirt will choose a value.
       If --print-xml is specified, then XML appropriate for checkpoint-create
       is output, rather than actually creating a checkpoint.

       The --diskspec option can be used to control which guest disks
       participate in the checkpoint. This option can occur multiple times,
       according to the number of <disk> elements in the domain xml.  Each
       <diskspec> is in the form disk[,checkpoint=type][,bitmap=name]. A literal
       --diskspec must precede each diskspec unless all three of domain, name,
       and description are also present.  For example, a diskspec of
       "vda,checkpoint=bitmap,bitmap=map1" results in the following XML:

          <disk name='vda' checkpoint='bitmap' bitmap='map1'/>

       If --quiesce is specified, libvirt will try to use guest agent to freeze
       and unfreeze domain's mounted file systems. However, if domain has no
       guest agent, checkpoint creation will fail.

       For now, it is not possible to create checkpoints in a domain that has
       snapshots, although this restriction will be lifted in a future release.

   checkpoint-edit
       Syntax:

          checkpoint-edit domain checkpointname

       Edit the XML configuration file for checkpointname of a domain.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh checkpoint-dumpxml dom name > checkpoint.xml
          vi checkpoint.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh checkpoint-create dom checkpoint.xml --redefine

       except that it does some error checking, including that the edits should
       not attempt to change the checkpoint name.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

   checkpoint-info
       Syntax:

          checkpoint-info domain checkpoint

       Output basic information about a named <checkpoint>.

   checkpoint-list
       Syntax:

          checkpoint-list domain [{--parent | --roots |
             [{--tree | --name}]}] [--topological]
             [[--from] checkpoint | [--descendants]]
             [--leaves] [--no-leaves]

       List all of the available checkpoints for the given domain, defaulting to
       show columns for the checkpoint name and creation time.

       Normally, table form output is sorted by checkpoint name; using
       --topological instead sorts so that no child is listed before its
       ancestors (although there may be more than one possible ordering with
       this property).

       If --parent is specified, add a column to the output table giving the
       name of the parent of each checkpoint.  If --roots is specified, the list
       will be filtered to just checkpoints that have no parents.  If --tree is
       specified, the output will be in a tree format, listing just checkpoint
       names.  These three options are mutually exclusive. If --name is
       specified only the checkpoint name is printed. This option is mutually
       exclusive with --tree.

       If --from is provided, filter the list to checkpoints which are children
       of the given checkpoint.  When used in isolation or with --parent, the
       list is limited to direct children unless --descendants is also present.
       When used with --tree, the use of --descendants is implied.  This option
       is not compatible with --roots.  Note that the starting point of --from
       is not included in the list unless the --tree option is also present.

       If --leaves is specified, the list will be filtered to just checkpoints
       that have no children.  Likewise, if --no-leaves is specified, the list
       will be filtered to just checkpoints with children.  (Note that omitting
       both options does no filtering, while providing both options will either
       produce the same list or error out depending on whether the server
       recognizes the flags).  Filtering options are not compatible with --tree.

   checkpoint-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          checkpoint-dumpxml domain checkpoint [--security-info] [--no-domain] [--size]

       Output the checkpoint XML for the domain's checkpoint named checkpoint.
       Using --security-info will also include security sensitive information.

       Using --size will add XML indicating the current size in bytes of guest
       data that has changed since the checkpoint was created (although remember
       that guest activity between a size check and actually creating a backup
       can result in the backup needing slightly more space). Note that some
       hypervisors may require that domain is running when --size is used.

       Using --no-domain will omit the <domain> element from the output for a
       more compact view.

   checkpoint-parent
       Syntax:

          checkpoint-parent domain checkpoint

       Output the name of the parent checkpoint, if any, for the given
       checkpoint.

   checkpoint-delete
       Syntax:

          checkpoint-delete domain checkpoint
             [--metadata] [{--children | --children-only}]

       Delete the checkpoint for the domain named checkpoint.  The record of
       which portions of the disk changed since the checkpoint are merged into
       the parent checkpoint (if any). If --children is passed, then delete this
       checkpoint and any children of this checkpoint.  If --children-only is
       passed, then delete any children of this checkpoint, but leave this
       checkpoint intact. These two flags are mutually exclusive.

       If --metadata is specified, then only delete the checkpoint metadata
       maintained by libvirt, while leaving the checkpoint contents intact for
       access by external tools; otherwise deleting a checkpoint also removes
       the ability to perform an incremental backup from that point in time.

NWFILTER COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate network filters. Network filters allow
       filtering of the network traffic coming from and going to virtual
       machines.  Individual network traffic filters are written in XML and may
       contain references to other network filters, describe traffic filtering
       rules, or contain both. Network filters are referenced by virtual
       machines from within their interface description. A network filter may be
       referenced by multiple virtual machines' interfaces.

   nwfilter-define
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-define xmlfile [--validate]

       Make a new network filter known to libvirt. If a network filter with the
       same name already exists, it will be replaced with the new XML.  Any
       running virtual machine referencing this network filter will have its
       network traffic rules adapted. If for any reason the network traffic
       filtering rules cannot be instantiated by any of the running virtual
       machines, then the new XML will be rejected.

       Optionally, the format of the input XML file can be validated against an
       internal RNG schema with --validate.

   nwfilter-undefine
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-undefine nwfilter-name

       Delete a network filter. The deletion will fail if any running virtual
       machine is currently using this network filter.

   nwfilter-list
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-list

       List all of the available network filters.

   nwfilter-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-dumpxml nwfilter-name

       Output the network filter XML.

   nwfilter-edit
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-edit nwfilter-name

       Edit the XML of a network filter.

       This is equivalent to:

          virsh nwfilter-dumpxml myfilter > myfilter.xml
          vi myfilter.xml (or make changes with your other text editor)
          virsh nwfilter-define myfilter.xml

       except that it does some error checking.  The new network filter may be
       rejected due to the same reason as mentioned in nwfilter-define.

       The editor used can be supplied by the $VISUAL or $EDITOR environment
       variables, and defaults to vi.

NWFILTER BINDING COMMANDS
       The following commands manipulate network filter bindings. Network filter
       bindings track the association between a network port and a network
       filter. Generally the bindings are managed automatically by the
       hypervisor drivers when adding/removing NICs on a guest.

       If an admin is creating/deleting TAP devices for non-guest usage,
       however, the network filter binding commands provide a way to make use of
       the network filters directly.

   nwfilter-binding-create
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-binding-create xmlfile [--validate]

       Associate a network port with a network filter. The network filter
       backend will immediately attempt to instantiate the filter rules on the
       port. This command may be used to associate a filter with a currently
       running guest that does not have a filter defined for a specific network
       port. Since the bindings are generally automatically managed by the
       hypervisor, using this command to define a filter for a network port and
       then starting the guest afterwards may prevent the guest from starting if
       it attempts to use the network port and finds a filter already defined.

       Optionally, the format of the input XML file can be validated against an
       internal RNG schema with --validate.

   nwfilter-binding-delete
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-binding-delete port-name

       Disassociate a network port from a network filter. The network filter
       backend will immediately tear down the filter rules that exist on the
       port. This command may be used to remove the network port binding for a
       filter currently in use for the guest while the guest is running without
       needing to restart the guest. Restoring the network port binding filter
       for the running guest would be accomplished by using
       nwfilter-binding-create.

   nwfilter-binding-list
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-binding-list

       List all of the network ports which have filters associated with them.

   nwfilter-binding-dumpxml
       Syntax:

          nwfilter-binding-dumpxml port-name

       Output the network filter binding XML for the network device called
       port-name.

HYPERVISOR-SPECIFIC COMMANDS
       NOTE: Use of the following commands is strongly discouraged.  They can
       cause libvirt to become confused and do the wrong thing on subsequent
       operations.  Once you have used these commands, please do not report
       problems to the libvirt developers; the reports will be ignored.  If you
       find that these commands are the only way to accomplish something, then
       it is better to request that the feature be added as a first-class
       citizen in the regular libvirt library.

   qemu-attach
       Syntax:

          qemu-attach pid

       Attach an externally launched QEMU process to the libvirt QEMU driver.
       The QEMU process must have been created with a monitor connection using
       the UNIX driver. Ideally the process will also have had the '-name'
       argument specified.

          $ qemu-kvm -cdrom ~/demo.iso \
              -monitor unix:/tmp/demo,server,nowait \
              -name foo \
              -uuid cece4f9f-dff0-575d-0e8e-01fe380f12ea  &
          $ QEMUPID=$!
          $ virsh qemu-attach $QEMUPID

       Not all functions of libvirt are expected to work reliably after
       attaching to an externally launched QEMU process. There may be issues
       with the guest ABI changing upon migration and device hotplug or
       hotunplug may not work. The attached environment should be considered
       primarily read-only.

   qemu-monitor-command
       Syntax:

          qemu-monitor-command domain { [--hmp] | [--pretty] [--return-value] } command...

       Send an arbitrary monitor command command to domain domain through the
       QEMU monitor.  The results of the command will be printed on stdout.

       If more than one argument is provided for command, they are concatenated
       with a space in between before passing the single command to the monitor.

       Note that libvirt uses the QMP to talk to qemu so command must be valid
       JSON in QMP format to work properly.

       If --pretty is given the QMP reply is pretty-printed.

       If --return-value is given the 'return' key of the QMP response object is
       extracted rather than passing through the full reply from QEMU.

       If --hmp is passed, the command is considered to be a human monitor
       command and libvirt will automatically convert it into QMP and convert
       the result back.

   qemu-agent-command
       Syntax:

          qemu-agent-command domain [--timeout seconds | --async | --block] command...

       Send an arbitrary guest agent command command to domain domain through
       QEMU agent.  --timeout, --async and --block options are exclusive.
       --timeout requires timeout seconds seconds and it must be positive.  When
       --aysnc is given, the command waits for timeout whether success or
       failed. And when --block is given, the command waits forever with
       blocking timeout.

   qemu-monitor-event
       Syntax:

          qemu-monitor-event [domain] [--event event-name]
            [--loop] [--timeout seconds] [--pretty] [--regex] [--no-case]
            [--timestamp]

       Wait for arbitrary QEMU monitor events to occur, and print out the
       details of events as they happen.  The events can optionally be filtered
       by domain or event-name.  The 'query-events' QMP command can be used via
       qemu-monitor-command to learn what events are supported.  If --regex is
       used, event-name is a basic regular expression instead of a literal
       string.  If --no-case is used, event-name will match case-insensitively.

       By default, this command is one-shot, and returns success once an event
       occurs; you can send SIGINT (usually via Ctrl-C) to quit immediately.  If
       --timeout is specified, the command gives up waiting for events after
       seconds have elapsed.  With --loop, the command prints all events until a
       timeout or interrupt key.  If --pretty is specified, any JSON event
       details are pretty-printed for better legibility.

       When --timestamp is used, a human-readable timestamp will be printed
       before the event, and the timing information provided by QEMU will be
       omitted.

   lxc-enter-namespace
       Syntax:

          lxc-enter-namespace domain [--noseclabel] --
             /path/to/binary [arg1, [arg2, ...]]

       Enter the namespace of domain and execute the command /path/to/binary
       passing the requested args. The binary path is relative to the container
       root filesystem, not the host root filesystem. The binary will inherit
       the environment variables / console visible to virsh. The command will be
       run with the same sVirt context and cgroups placement as processes within
       the container. This command only works when connected to the LXC
       hypervisor driver.  This command succeeds only if /path/to/binary has 0
       exit status.

       By default the new process will run with the security label of the new
       parent container. Use the --noseclabel option to instead have the process
       keep the same security label as virsh.

ENVIRONMENT
       The following environment variables can be set to alter the behaviour of
       virsh

       • VIRSH_DEBUG=<0 to 4>

         Turn on verbose debugging of virsh commands. Valid levels are

         • VIRSH_DEBUG=0

           DEBUG - Messages at ALL levels get logged

         • VIRSH_DEBUG=1

           INFO - Logs messages at levels INFO, NOTICE, WARNING and ERROR

         • VIRSH_DEBUG=2

           NOTICE - Logs messages at levels NOTICE, WARNING and ERROR

         • VIRSH_DEBUG=3

           WARNING - Logs messages at levels WARNING and ERROR

         • VIRSH_DEBUG=4

           ERROR - Messages at only ERROR level gets logged.

       • VIRSH_LOG_FILE=``LOGFILE``

         The file to log virsh debug messages.

       • VIRSH_DEFAULT_CONNECT_URI

         The hypervisor to connect to by default. Set this to a URI, in the same
         format as accepted by the connect option. This environment variable is
         deprecated in favour of the global LIBVIRT_DEFAULT_URI variable which
         serves the same purpose.

       • LIBVIRT_DEFAULT_URI

         The hypervisor to connect to by default. Set this to a URI, in the same
         format as accepted by the connect option. This overrides the default
         URI set in any client config file and prevents libvirt from probing for
         drivers.

       • VISUAL

         The editor to use by the edit and related options.

       • EDITOR

         The editor to use by the edit and related options, if VISUAL is not
         set.

       • VIRSH_HISTSIZE

         The number of commands to remember in the command  history.  The
         default value is 500.

       • LIBVIRT_DEBUG=LEVEL

         Turn on verbose debugging of all libvirt API calls. Valid levels are

         • LIBVIRT_DEBUG=1

           Messages at level DEBUG or above

         • LIBVIRT_DEBUG=2

           Messages at level INFO or above

         • LIBVIRT_DEBUG=3

           Messages at level WARNING or above

         • LIBVIRT_DEBUG=4

           Messages at level ERROR

       For further information about debugging options consult
       https://libvirt.org/logging.html

BUGS
       Please report all bugs you discover.  This should be done via either:

       1. the mailing list

          https://libvirt.org/contact.html

       2. the bug tracker

          https://libvirt.org/bugs.html

       Alternatively, you may report bugs to your software distributor / vendor.

AUTHORS
       Please refer to the AUTHORS file distributed with libvirt.

COPYRIGHT
       Copyright (C) 2005, 2007-2015 Red Hat, Inc., and the authors listed in
       the libvirt AUTHORS file.

LICENSE
       virsh is distributed under the terms of the GNU LGPL v2+.  This is free
       software; see the source for copying conditions. There is NO warranty;
       not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE

SEE ALSO
       virt-install(1), virt-xml-validate(1), virt-top(1), virt-df(1),
       https://libvirt.org/



                                                                        VIRSH(1)